Chronic Shoulder Instability: Orthopedic Denton

by Administrator 18. January 2017 18:40

The shoulder is one of the most mobile joints of the body which is made up of three main bones, the upper arm bone (humerus), shoulder blade (scapula) and collar bone (clavicle). However, the extensive range of motion of the joint makes it prone to injuries and instability. The upper end of the humerus fits into a cavity within the shoulder blade known as glenoid. It is held in place by strong ligament structures but an external trauma or overuse may push the humeral head out of the socket, leaving the joint unstable. Once it occurs, the shoulder tends to become susceptible to repeated incidences of injury. This condition is medically termed as Chronic Shoulder Instability. It may lead to partial or complete displacement of the humeral head.

Causes

  • Injury or trauma- A sudden injury to the shoulder or arm may push the humerus out of the glenoid. This occurs as a result of damage to the ligaments, tendons and cartilage structures that support the bones. Weak connective tissues make the joint prone to repeated episodes of instability
  • Bankart Lesion-  Damage to the cartilage lining between the humeral head and glenoid may make the shoulder unstable
  • Stress caused due to activities that require repeated overhead movement of the arm, such as swimming, playing tennis, painting etc., may loosen the ligaments
  • Inherent weakness of the muscles and soft tissue structures that support the shoulder joint. They tend to suffer from multi-directional instability and the bone may slip out from the glenoid in different directions
  • Double jointed- Excessive flexibility of the shoulder joint may also increase the risk of instability

Symptoms

  • Pain in the upper arm, neck and shoulder
  • Weakness
  • Feeling that the shoulder may give away
  • Frequent subluxations may occur

Diagnosis

  • Patient’s medical history and shoulder injuries may be taken into consideration by the orthopedic doctor
  • The patient may be asked to move the arm in different directions to check for the range of motion
  • X-ray imaging may be conducted to assess the extent of damage to the joint
  • MRI scan may be required to study the condition of the soft tissue structures

Treatment

Chronic Shoulder Instability can be treated through conservative methods initially but if the symptoms do not subside or the condition weakens, surgery may be required. Treatment may include the following:

  • Some lifestyle changes and modification of the daily activities may be suggested to relieve the symptoms. Any task that requires overhead movement of the arm should be avoided
  • Physical therapy program may be initiated to increase the strength of the supporting muscles in the joint.
  • A sling may be worn to provide support to the joint and allow the bone to get back to its original position
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines may also be prescribed by the orthopedic doctor
  • In severe cases, cortisone injections may be administered directly into the joint
  • Surgical repair of weak or torn ligaments and reattaching them to the bone to increase stability
  • Arthroscopic surgery may be performed to remove damaged cartilage and any loose fragments within the joint

OrthoTexas provides effective treatment for Chronic Shoulder Instability and other medical conditions. To schedule an appointment with the orthopedic doctors in Denton, TX, you can call at (940) 382-1577.

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Adolescent Anterior Knee Pain: Orthopedic Treatment

by Administrator 14. January 2017 07:47

Adolescent Anterior Knee Pain is a medical condition that affects physically active teenagers. It is characterized by pain and discomfort in the area surrounding the kneecap. The knee is the largest and one of the most complex joints comprising of three bones, femur, tibia and patella. Various ligaments and tendons support these bones as well as hold them in place. Stress or damage to any of these parts can lead to Adolescent Anterior Knee Pain. The condition is more commonly seen in girls as compared to boys.

Causes

  • Overuse of the joint
  • Sudden change in the intensity and technique of physical activity
  • Weak quadriceps or hamstring muscles
  • Inherent defects in alignment of the kneecap, leg and hip joint
  • Wearing ill-fitted shoes
  • Incorrect exercise or sports technique
  • Tight ligaments in the knee joint

Symptoms

  • Dull and persistent ache that may increase following a physical activity or exercise
  • Pain may also occur while resting
  • Difficulty in squatting, climbing stairs, weight lifting and running
  • Cracking or locking sensation around the knee joint while moving
  • Discomfort while getting up after prolonged sitting
  • Feeling of the joint being unstable
  • Swelling around the kneecap

Diagnosis

  • Physical examination which may include palpation, observing the shape of the kneecap, tightness of the ligaments and other visible symptoms
  • Range of motion tests may be done by asking the patient to perform some physical movements such as jumping, walking, bending, squatting etc.
  • The patient’s medical history and lifestyle details may be taken into consideration by the knee specialist
  • X-ray imaging may be conducted to assess the anatomical changes in the kneecap and other supporting structures
  • MRI scan may help to diagnose damage to the soft tissues

Treatment

Adolescent Anterior Knee Pain can be treated through conservative methods. Some of them are listed below:

  • Use of comfortable shoes that provide adequate support to the feet and prevent stress to the knee joint
  • The intensity and duration of physical activity must be reduced till the symptoms subside. Any exercise or sport that may lead to pain should be avoided
  • Anti-inflammatory medicines may be prescribed by the doctor to relieve pain
  • Hamstring and quadriceps muscle strengthening exercises may be recommended to provide better support to the knee
  • Application of ice packs at regular intervals may help to alleviate pain and swelling
  • Orthotic devices such as shoe inserts or molded arch supports can be used to combat pain and discomfort
  • Regular physical therapy sessions may help  to enhance flexibility and range of motion

The orthopedic surgeons at OrthoTexas provide complete treatment for Adolescent Anterior Knee Pain. Patients in Allen, TX can call at (972) 727-9995 for appointment.

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Radiculopathy: Orthopedic Treatment In McKinney

by Administrator 10. January 2017 13:26

Radiculopathy is a medical condition that occurs when a nerve in the spine gets pinched or irritated. There are several nerves or ‘nerve roots’ that emerge from the intervertebral joints and spread out into different parts of the body, thus controlling their movement as well as sensation. Radiculopathy may affect the cervical, thoracic or lower spine. However, it is most commonly observed in the lumbar portion. The cervical spine controls the neck and the arms, the abdomen and chest are controlled by the thoracic spine while the legs, hips and the feet are affected by the lumbar spine. The location of the pinched nerve determines which part of the body will have the symptoms.

Causes

  • Activities that lead to overuse or excessive stressing of the spine
  • Injury during contact sports
  • Genetic traits may predispose family members to develop Radiculopathy
  • Doing excessive labor work or lifting heavy weights
  • Disc Herniation may pressurize the nerve as it emerges out of the joint spaces within the spine
  • Osteophytes or bone spurs may put pressure on the spinal nerves
  • Thickening of the ligaments supporting the spine
  • Osteoarthritis of the spine
  • Bone tumor
  • Spinal infection
  • Abnormal curvature of the spine developed due to Scoliosis
  • External trauma

Symptoms

  • Pain which is generally localized depending on the nerve that is pinched. It may occur in the lower back or the neck and may radiate down into the arms, legs, thighs and buttocks
  • Numbness or tingling sensation in the legs and arms
  • The affected part of the spine may feel tender when touched
  • The muscles controlled by the nerve tend to get weak and may also result in Paralysis

Diagnosis

  • The medical and family history of the patient may be taken into consideration
  • A detailed physical examination and analysis of the symptoms reported. The orthopedic doctor may test the range of motion, muscle strength and abnormalities in reflexes, if any
  • X-ray imaging may be done to identify tumors, changes in spine structure, osteophytes etc.
  • MRI or CT scan may be conducted to analyze the location of the affected nerve and condition of soft tissue structures, discs or ligaments
  • An EMG test may be recommended to identify nerve damage

Treatment

  • The patient may be advised to take rest and avoid any activity that causes stress to the back or neck
  • A physical therapy program may be initiated to educate the patient about good postural habits, techniques to perform physical tasks without stressing the spine and exercises to strengthen the supporting structures
  • Lumbar traction may be recommended in some cases to alleviate the nerve compression and create more intervertebral space
  • Injecting steroids directly into the affected part of the spine may help to relieve pain
  • Anti-inflammatory medicines may be prescribed by the doctor
  • Laminectomy- Surgical removal of the bone that compresses the nerve
  • Discectomy- Surgical removal of the Herniated Disc that may be pressing upon the nerve root

For treatment of Radiculopathy and other spine conditions, visit OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment with the orthopedic surgeons in McKinney, TX, you can call at (972) 727 – 9995.

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Spinal Instability: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 6. January 2017 12:31

Spinal Instability or Lumbar Instability is a condition that occurs when the inter-vertebral discs in the spine begin to degenerate. The bulge of the disc decreases and begins to lose height. This causes the vertebrae to displace from their anatomical position and override the disc. It eventually produces friction between the vertebrae, causing pain and several other symptoms. The micro movement within the spine irritates the nerves that emerge out of the joint spaces. The condition may increase the risk of Spinal Arthritis and development of bone spurs. Spinal Instability may also affect the ability of the spine to maintain the body’s structure and movement.

Causes

  • External trauma or fracture of the spine
  • Metastatic tumors in the spine
  • Degenerative Disc Disease
  • Congenital defects in the spinal cord
  • Scoliosis
  • Spondylolisthesis
  • Disorders of the connective tissues
  • Poor lifting techniques

Symptoms

  • Severe pain in the back while lifting objects, bending and straightening the spine
  • A feeling of locking in between a physical activity such as getting up from a chair
  • Muscle spasms
  • Pain may radiate down into the legs and buttocks, generally affecting one side of the body
  • Numbness in the lower extremities and arms
  • The symptoms may get aggravated after prolonged sitting or standing
  • Laughing, coughing or sneezing may also induce pain

Diagnosis

  • Details of the patient’s medical history and lifestyle may be noted down
  • MRI and CT scan Severe pain in the back while lifting objects, bending and straightening the spine
  • X-ray imaging (in a sitting and standing position) may be required to study the changes in the bone structure
  • The doctor may probe the spine to recreate conditions that are likely to cause pain. This helps to diagnose the pattern of pain and the movements that cause it.

Treatment

  • Physical therapy may be effective in treating mild Spinal Instability as it focuses on strengthening the muscles in the spine.
  • Pain killers and anti-inflammatory medicines may be prescribed by the doctor.
  • Microdiscectomy- Surgical removal of the intervertebral disc that is impinging on the spinal nerve.
  • Spinal Fusion- Two or more spinal vertebrae are fused together to prevent any movement between them and improve the stability of the spine.

For treatment of Spinal Instability and other orthopedic conditions, visit OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment with the spine surgeons in Frisco, you can call at (214) 618-5502 or visit 5757 Warren Pkwy, Suite 180, Frisco, TX 75034.

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Osteochondritis Dissecans Of The Elbow

by Administrator 30. December 2016 07:34

The elbow joint consists of various bones and tissues that are nourished by the blood supply from numerous arteries. Insufficient or loss of blood supply to these parts may lead to death of the bone and the articular cartilage that protects it. This condition is termed as the Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Elbow. The lower part of the humerus, Capitellum, is most commonly affected by the condition. It helps to rotate the palm and forearm.

In most cases, Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Elbow is observed in people aged 10-20 years who are particularly active in sports. The damage to the bone or the cartilage may be partial or complete. If it is partially affected, the problem may heal through conservative methods of treatment. However, in severe cases, the bone piece or cartilage tissue may get detached and begin floating within the joint spaces.

Causes

  • People with a family history of Osteochondritis Dissecans are more likely to develop this condition
  • Repeated injuries to the joint may eventually result in loss of blood supply (Avascular Necrosis)
  • Indulging in sports that require excessive overhead movement, such as basketball, tennis, volleyball, gymnastics etc., may stress the elbow joint
  • Occupations or activities that require lifting heavy weights

Symptoms

  • Pain while bending or straightening the elbow
  • Crepitus- a sensation or sound of bone cracking when the elbow is moved
  • Swelling and tenderness
  • Limited range of motion
  • A feeling of the joint being unstable

Diagnosis

  • Detailed clinical evaluation of the joint using palpation, visual analysis and moving the affected arm in different directions
  • Family and medical history of the patient may be taken into consideration
  • MRI or CT scans may be carried out to assess the exact location and severity of damage to the cartilage
  • X-ray imaging may be done to examine the changes in bone structure

Treatment

  • Immobilization of the joint using a brace, splint, sling or cast
  • The patient may be required to abstain from any activity that causes puts stress on the elbow. This is usually recommended in cases where the bone or cartilage is partially damaged. The patient, being in the growth phase, tends to develop new bone mass and cartilage tissue that repairs the damaged one
  • Physical therapy may be recommended to maintain joint health and flexibility
  • Corticosteroid injections may be administered directly into the joint for immediate relief
  • Surgical removal of the damaged bone mass or cartilage
  • Arthroscopic surgery to drill holes into the bone to increase blood supply to the affected area and promote cartilage growth
  • Loose parts of the bone may be held in place using screws and pins
  • Bone and cartilage graft- A piece of healthy bone or cartilage tissue may be extracted from another part of the body and planted in place of the damaged ones to  regain functionality of the joint

For diagnosis and treatment of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Elbow, visit OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment with the elbow doctors in Plano, TX, you can call at (972) 985 – 1072.

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Quadriceps Tendon Rupture: Orthopedic Frisco

by Administrator 27. December 2016 10:30

Quadriceps tendon refers to the band of tissues that allow the four quadriceps femoris muscles (vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, rectus femoris and vastus intermedius) to converge above the patella. This tendon, in association with the quadriceps muscles, enables the extension of the knee joint. Excessive stretching and tearing of this tendon is referred to as the Quadriceps Tendon Rupture. The condition most commonly affects people above the age of 40 years. The rupture is generally preceded by the degeneration of the structure due to other factors. This injury may result in physical disabilities and in some cases a part of the patella also breaks along with the tendon attached to it.

Causes

  • The predisposing factors that may cause Quadriceps Tendon Rupture are as follows
  • Medical conditions like Obesity, Diabetes, Gout, Renal failure, Hyperparathyroidism etc.
  • Prolonged immobilization of the lower extremities
  • Falling on a flexed knee
  • Direct trauma to the kneecap during sports or vehicular accident
  • Laceration
  • Overuse injuries due to excessive jumping or running
  • Inflammation of the quadriceps tendon

Symptoms

  • Severe Pain
  • Swelling and tenderness
  • The joint becomes unstable and the patient may fall or stumble while walking
  • A popping sensation at the time of injury
  • The pain increases with physical activity
  • Change in color of the skin around the knee

Diagnosis

  • the orthopedic doctor may peform thorough clinical evaluation of the injured leg
  • The patient’s medical history, mode of injury and lifestyle details may be taken into consideration
  • X-ray imaging may help to reveal the bone structure and fractures if any
  • MRI and CT scan may help to evaluate the extent of damage to the soft tissue structures
  • The range of motion may be analyzed

Treatment

Partial tears can be treated through conservative methods while the complete tears require surgical treatment. These may include the following procedures.

  • The knee may be immobilized for a period of 3-5 weeks
  • Physical therapy may be recommended to improve range of motion
  • Exercises focused on strengthening the hamstring muscles must be performed
  • Lifestyle modifications may be recommended
  • Rest the injured leg by keeping it elevated at chest level
  • Compression may be done using soft bandage
  • Use of ice packs during the first 24-72 hours of injury may be helpful
  • Plasma injections that have a rich platelet count may promote healing of the tendon
  • Wires, screws and pins may be used to secure the tendon in place

To know more about the treatment options available for Quadriceps Tendon Rupture, consult the surgeons at OrthoTexas. For an appointment, visit 5757 Warren Pkwy, Suite 180, Frisco, TX 75034 or call at (214) 618-5502.

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Ulnar Collateral Ligament Injury: Orthopedic Treatment In Carrollton

by Administrator 24. December 2016 10:19

The Ulnar Collateral Ligament is a band of ligaments that connects the upper arm bone (humerus) to the lower arm bone (ulna). These soft tissue structures stabilize the elbow joint and allow a person to perform overhead arm movements such as playing tennis or throwing a ball. An ulnar collateral Injury occurs due to stretching, loosening or tearing of these ligaments. The condition may result in physical limitations and is a common injury observed in sportspersons. Ulnar Collateral Ligament damage does not occur due to stress form daily activities as this type of damage requires a considerable amount of force that exceeds the threshold of the ligaments to cause lengthening or tears. This injury has a high incidence of re-occurring post treatment.

Causes

  • Overuse injuries caused by repeated overhead movement such as playing volleyball or basketball
  • Inherent weakness of the muscles and ligaments
  • Improper throwing techniques
  • Not warming up before indulging in a sport
  • Elbow Dislocations
  • The ligaments may be damaged due to surgical procedures applied on the elbow joint or the upper arm

Symptoms

  • Pain in the elbow joint and the arm, which may increase while performing tasks that require lifting the hands or arms above the head
  • Swelling and tenderness in the inner side of the elbow joint or the upper arm
  • Limited range of motion
  • A tingling sensation in the arm and inner side of the elbow
  • Weakness in the elbow joint
  • Numbness in the fingers (particularly little finger) and hand
  • Loss of grip
  • A popping sound at the time of injury
  • Stiffness
  • Change in color of the fingernails

Diagnosis

  • Analysis of the existing symptoms reported by the patient
  • MRI scan may be required to view the ligaments
  • The doctor may use palpation and pressure to identify the exact location of pain

Treatment

  • The patient may be recommended to take rest and abstain from any physical activities that cause pain
  • Physical therapy with special focus on ROM (range of motion) exercises may be recommended to accelerate recovery
  • Anti-inflammatory medicines may be prescribed by the doctor
  • Ice packs may be applied to ease pain and swelling
  • Protective splint or elbow brace may be recommended
  • In case of complete tear, surgery may be suggested. It will aim at reconstructing the ligament and removing the damaged parts, if any
  • It may also be advised to avoid arm movements that aggravate pain or increase the risk of injury

The surgeons at OrthoTexas offer complete treatment for Ulnar Collateral Ligament Injury. To schedule an appointment, call at (972) 492-1334 or visit 4780 North Josey Lane, Carrollton, TX 75010.

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Haglund’s Deformity: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 20. December 2016 09:02

Haglund's Deformity, also known as Mulholland Deformity or Pump Bump, refers to the abnormal growth in the bony structure behind the heel bone. The condition eventually causes the bursae (located between this bone and Achilles tendon) to become irritated and swollen. Haglund’s Deformity can affect any person although it is more commonly observed in women.

Causes

  • Prolonged wearing of hard shoes with a closed back that rubs against the heel bone
  • Genetic deformity in the shape or structure of the heel bone
  • Presence of a high-arched foot
  • Tightness of the Achilles tendon
  • Unusual gait such as walking on the outer side of the heel
  • Running on hard surfaces
  • Excess body weight can stress the heel bone and the tendons
  • Past injuries to the foot or heel

Symptoms

  • Visible outgrowth of the bone behind the heel
  • Considerable pain while walking or wearing shoes
  • The back of the heel feels swollen and tender when touched
  • Redness
  • Tightness in the heel or at the back of the foot while moving

Diagnosis

  • Clinical evaluation of the affected foot
  • X-ray imaging may be required to analyze changes in foot structure
  • Analysis of the patient’s gait
  • The symptoms reported by the patient, daily activities as well as type of shoes worn may be taken into consideration to establish the cause and diagnosis

Treatment

Non-surgical Treatment

  • Using customized orthotic supports may allow even distribution of pressure on the foot and prevent the bone from rubbing
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines may be prescribed by the doctor
  • Use of heel pads may be recommended to prevent pressurizing the heel
  • Ice packs may be help to reduce swelling
  • Wearing open shoes may help to reduce pain while walking
  • In severe cases, an immobilizing boot or temporary cast may be recommended

Surgical Treatment

If the Achilles tendon is tight or damaged, surgery may be required to reduce the pressure on the joint. During the procedure, the orthopedic doctor removes the outgrowth and smoothens the bone.

Post-surgery, the patient may be recommended to wear soft padded shoes and use crutches to prevent weight bearing.

For complete treatment of Haglund's Deformity, visit the orthopedic foot doctors at OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment, call at (940) 382-1577.

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Scapula (Shoulder Blade) Fractures: Orthopedic Plano

by Administrator 16. December 2016 05:05

The scapula or shoulder blade is a triangular bone in the shoulder joint which is surrounded by muscles and tissues. Any break or crack in the bone can lead to a scapula fracture. It is a rare injury because this bone is relatively stable and can move in different directions which reduces the chances of breakage. In most cases, scapula fracture is accompanied by damage to the ribs, collar bone, spine and lungs.

Causes

  • Vehicular accidents that involve high energy traumas
  • A fall on the shoulder
  • Direct hit with a blunt object
  • Trying to prevent a fall by stretching out the arm may damage the shoulder blade

Symptoms

  • Severe pain while moving the arm or upper body
  • Swelling and tenderness in the thoracic region
  • Bruising and discoloration
  • Open wounds may be present
  • Crepitus, i.e. the sensation of bones grinding against each other
  • Limited range of motion

Diagnosis

  • Detailed clinical evaluation of the injured shoulder
  • The orthopedic doctor may look for any additional injuries
  • CT scan or MRI may be required for a detailed view of the soft tissue structures and scapula
  • Nerve conduction test may be carried out to check for impulses in the arms and hands. This can help to rule out damage to the blood vessels

Treatment

  • Most scapula fractures can be treated with conservative methods and surgery is rarely needed.
  • Use of a shoulder sling to keep the joint in place as well as to allow the bones and soft tissues to heal completely.
  • Passive stretching exercises may be recommended to regain mobility and reduce stiffness post immobilization
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines may be prescribed to relieve pain
  • In case a part of the bone is displaced during the injury, surgical reduction may be required. The repositioned bones are held in place using metal screws and plates
  • It may take about 6 months or a year for the fracture to heal and the joint function to be restored completely. Regular physical therapy sessions may speed up the recovery.

For comprehensive diagnosis and treatment of scapula fracture, visit OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment with the orthopedic surgeons in Plano, TX call at (972) 985 – 1072.

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Orthopedic Treatment For Back Spasm

by Administrator 12. December 2016 07:32

Back spasm refers to the sudden, involuntary muscle contractions that lead to sharp pain in the lower back. A spasm is considered to be a natural mechanism through which the muscles protect themselves from the external or internal stress to any part of the body.

In the back, a spasm may be an indicator of either an underlying condition or injury to any of the spinal structures. It requires immediate medical attention and if left untreated, may result in permanent physical disability.

Causes

  • Anatomical conditions such as Herniated Disc, Spinal Stenosis, Osteoarthritis of the spine, Spondylolysis or Degenerative Disc Disease
  • Overuse injuries
  • Poor postural habits
  • Direct injury to the spine
  • Sports injuries
  • Vehicular accidents
  • Dehydration as well as deficiency of calcium and potassium
  • Lifting heavy weights
  • Spinal abnormalities, such as Kyphosis and Lordosis
  • Weak muscles along the spine and stomach

Symptoms

  • Sudden tightening of the back muscles
  • Dull or severe pain
  • Limited range of motion
  • Pain may be felt even while resting
  • Tingling sensation in the back, upper or lower extremities
  • Uncontrolled bladder and bowel movements
  • Numbness

Diagnosis

  • The patient may be questioned about the duration and onset of the pain, routine activities, occupation, past injuries, medications etc.
  • Palpation may be done to identify the exact location of the pain
  • The patient may be asked to perform some physical movements to identify the positions that increase pain
  • X-ray imaging may be done to analyze the bone structure
  • MRI and CT scan may help to diagnose problems in the soft tissue as well as vertebrae

Treatment

The aim of the treatment is to allow the affected muscles and soft tissues to heal naturally. For this, an orthopedic doctor may recommend the following treatment options:

  • Lie down on your back and keep the upper part of the body slightly elevated using pillows
  • Anti-inflammatory medicines and muscle relaxants may help to relieve pain
  • Applying ice packs at regular intervals to the affected part may help to reduce inflammation
  • Performing light exercises may help to improve blood circulation within the spine and promote healing
  • Using heat pads may provide immediate relief from muscle stress
  • Avoiding activities such as lifting weights, bending, twisting etc. may prevent aggravated pain and discomfort
  • Physical therapy may be required to promote muscle strength, flexibility as well as prevent recurring flare ups in the future

The spine specialists at OrthoTexas provide complete diagnosis and treatment for back spasm and other orthopedic conditions. To request an appointment with the surgeons in Allen, TX, feel free to call at (972) 727-9995.

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