Shoulder Pain

by Administrator 16. May 2017 09:00

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Orthopedic Treatment For Cervical Pain

by Administrator 12. May 2017 06:58

The neck is a flexible joint that supports the weight of the head. It undergoes a lot of movement and is therefore prone to stress and injuries. Cervical or neck pain is a common problem affecting the people irrespective of gender or age. It is generally not a symptom or indication of a serious underlying disorder.

Causes

  • Maintaining a poor posture, hunching or slouching while sitting are common contributing factors
  • Sitting and working on the computer for too long or using the mobile phone continuously
  • Osteoarthritis- loss of cushioning between the neck joints due to ageing
  • Vehicular accident may cause a shock to the cervical region of the spine (Whiplash injuries)
  • A fall from a height
  • Sea divers are at a risk of developing cervical pain
  • Habit of gritting the teeth can strain the neck muscles
  • Reading while lying down in bed
  • Compression of nerves due to Herniated Discs or Bone Spurs
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis, Meningitis

Symptoms

  • Numbness
  • Pain which can be mild or severe that shoots down the arms and shoulders
  • Tenderness in the affected area
  • Weakness or loss of strength in the upper extremities
  • Tightness in the neck and shoulder muscles
  • Muscle spasms
  • Recurrent headaches
  • Reduced flexibility of the neck
  • Pricks or tingling sensation in the neck and upper parts of the body
  • Coughing or sneezing may cause pain

Diagnosis

  • Details of the medical history of the patient may be taken down
  • The doctor may palpate to check for tenderness, muscle weakness and loss of movement
  • X-ray imaging may be required to check for structural changes in the spine
  • MRI scan may be helpful in taking images of the soft tissues and bone structure
  • CT scan may present a detailed three dimensional picture of the spine
  • Blood tests to check for spinal infections or inflammation
  • Electromyography - nerve test that is conducted by inserting needles through the skin of the neck

Treatment

  • The physician may prescribe painkillers and muscle relaxants
  • Physical therapy sessions may help to align the cervical vertebrae and strengthen the neck muscles as well as soft tissues
  • Application of heat pads or ice packs may reduce inflammation and pain
  • Electrical stimulation may help to ease the pain and promote nerve functioning
  • Manual traction using weights and pulleys to increase intervertebral spaces in the cervical
  • Use of a soft neck collar for a short duration for support
  • The doctor may inject steroids into the affected part
  • Nerve compression may be released through surgery
  • Gentle exercises may be performed to keep the joints in good health

For complete treatment of Cervical Pain, visit the spine specialists at OrthoTexas. They offer surgical as well as non-surgical treatment to provide relief from pain. For an appointment, call at (214) 618 - 5502 or visit 5757 Warren Pkwy, Suite 180, Frisco, TX 75034.

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Subscapularis Tendon Tears: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 9. May 2017 06:29

A group of four muscles, known as the rotator cuff muscles, control the movement of the upper arm and shoulder. The subscapularis muscle is the strongest muscle of this group that is located on the front side of the upper arm. It keeps the muscle stable and helps in inward rotation of the arm. This muscle also prevents the head of the humerus from slipping out of the shoulder socket. About two- thirds of this muscle is made up of tendons which makes it prone to injuries, particularly in athletes who indulge in swimming, playing tennis or throwing actions. Damage to the tendon that supports this muscle is termed as Subscapularis Tendon Tears.

Causes

  • Repeated arm movement that involves lifting or throwing actions
  • Inefficient warm ups before playing a sport
  • Overuse injuries
  • Playing a sport or training when the muscles are strained or injured
  • Inherent mechanical problems in the shoulder joint
  • Tendinitis- prolonged use of the muscles leads to degeneration
  • Falling on the shoulder to break a fall
  • Forceful forward or backward movement of the arm
  • Slipping out of the biceps tendon from its grove and cutting across the subscapularis tendon

Symptoms

  • Pain in the front part of the shoulder, which may get aggravated with upper arm or body movement.
  • Decreased movement of the joint.
  • Lifting, twisting and rotation of the arm may be painful
  • Weakness of internal rotation
  • Anterior shoulder swelling
  • Tenderness in the affected part of the joint
  • The shoulder may hurt when touched

Diagnosis

  • Bear-hug test
  • Gerber’s Lift Test
  • Belly-press Test
  • Ultrasound
  • MRI Scan

Treatment

  • The preferred mode of treatment in elderly patients is physical therapy for this condition.
  • Arthroscopic surgery may be recommended in people who are physically active. During the procedure, the tendon is replaced or treated as per the severity of the condition
  • Pec Major Transfer- This surgical procedure is adopted in case of chronic tears. The Pectoralis major muscle is transferred in place of the subscapularis as it has the capability to perform the same function
  • Sufficient rest is required for the affected shoulder and all activities that cause stress to the joint need to be avoided
  • Injecting cortisones into the affected part may provide immediate relief
  • Post-surgery, physical therapy and gradual mobility training may be helpful in regaining movement and strength
  • The operated arm may be immobilized using a sling for a few days or weeks

To know more about the treatment options for Subscapularis Tendon Tears, consult the physicians at OrthoTexas. You can call at (972) 727-9995 or visit 7300 Eldorado Parkway, Suites 165/165A, McKinney, TX 75070.

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Basal Joint Arthritis: Treatment In Carrollton, TX

by Administrator 4. May 2017 07:04

The joints in the human body have a thin layer of cartilage lining between the bones, for their smooth and frictionless movement. Basal Joint Arthritis refers to a condition in which the cartilage in the thumb joint (at the base of the thumb) degenerates, causing the bones to rub against each other. The condition may occur due to excessive wear and tear of the joint cartilage or with age. This form of Arthritis is commonly seen in women above the age of forty years.

Causes

  • Women are more likely to develop Basal Arthritis
  • Past injuries such as fractures and dislocations may predispose a person to such problems
  • Overuse injuries
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Genetic factors such as Joint Ligament Laxity
  • Joint malformation
  • Obesity

Symptoms

  • Considerable pain may be felt in the joint and surrounding muscles
  • Burning sensation in the joint
  • Inability to use the thumb or hand comfortably to perform daily tasks such as opening a container or a bottle lid, turning a door knob etc.
  • Weakened grip
  • Inflammation and tenderness in the affected part
  • A hard bony lump may form at the base of the thumb

Diagnosis

  • X-ray imaging may help to reveal bone spurs and cartilage damage
  • Analysis of the patient’s lifestyle, past medical records and symptoms reported
  • A detailed physical examination may be conducted by an orthopedic doctor to check for visible deformities and changes in joint structure
  • Pressure may be applied by moving the thumb in different directions to check if it causes pain or a grinding sensation

Treatment

Basal Arthritis can be treated through conservative methods in the initial stages. In the advanced stages, surgical intervention may be recommended. The methods may include the following:

  • Prescription of anti-inflammatory medication and pain killers
  • Resting the affected joint and abstaining from any stress-causing activities
  • Application of ice packs at regular intervals
  • Splints may be used to lend support to the joint
  • Injecting cortisones into the affected area may provide immediate relief from the symptoms.
  • Arthroplasty- surgical removal of the damaged joint and replacing it with a bone graft or an artificial piece of bone.
  • Arthrodesis- permanent fusion of the bones of the joint
  • Osteotomy- surgical repositioning of the bones in the joint
  • Trapeziectomy- removal of the trapezium bone from the joint for more stability

To know more about Basal Joint Arthritis and its treatment options, consult the doctors at OrthoTexas. Call at (972) 492 – 1334 for an appointment or visit 4780 North Josey Lane, Carrollton, TX 75010.

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Ankle Instability: Orthopedic Treatment In McKinney

by Administrator 29. April 2017 07:38

Ankle Instability is a condition that occurs when the outer ligaments that support the ankle joint are injured or damaged. The condition can be either mechanical or functional. In case of mechanical instability, the ligaments become loose resulting in laxity. However, in functional instability, the ankle joint is anatomically stable but the patient has a constant feeling of joint weakness. The ligaments that get affected in this condition are the anterior talofibular ligament and the calcaneofibular ligament.

Causes

  • Ligament tear, stretch or rupture
  • Repeated episodes of ankle sprain
  • Arthritis of ankle joint
  • Damage to nerves that surround the ankle
  • Osteochondral lesions that develop in the talus and thus damage the joint cartilage
  • Conditions like Flat Foot or Hindfoot Varus Alignment
  • Presence of loose ligaments in the ankle
  • Sports activities that involves a lot of jumping and high impact movement
  • Bone spurs may impinge upon the ligament
  • Bone fractures in leg or foot
  • Inflammation of synovium lining within the joint

Symptoms

  • Bruising
  • Inability to bear body weight on the ankle and foot joint
  • Constant pain on the outer part of inside the ankle
  • A constant feeling of the ankle rolling outwards whenever moved
  • Swelling and stiffness
  • Change in gait and development of a limp
  • Hypermobility of the joint

Diagnosis

  • Analysis of the symptoms and medical history
  • Weight bearing X-ray imaging
  • MRI and CT scans may be required
  • Fluoroscopy
  • The exact location of pain may be assessed through palpation

Treatment

Conservative treatment methods include the following

  • Wearing an ankle brace for joint support
  • Painkillers and anti inflammatory medicines may be prescribed
  • All physical movements that stress the joint need to be avoided for some time
  • Physical therapy may help to improve joint function and strength
  • Compression of the joint using a soft bandage is necessary
  • Use proper foot wear and shoe inserts that help support the joint
  • Ankle splinting and taping may be helpful
  • Ankle Proprioception- Special therapy that improves brain and ankle coordination
    Steroids may be injected directly into the joint

Surgical methods of treatment include the following

  • Brostrom Procedure- Surgical tightening or shortening of the injured ligaments.
  • Replacement of the damaged tissue using donor tissue which may have been extracted from a body part or artificially synthesized
  • Calcaneal Osteotomy helps to realign the hindfoot by cutting the heel bone and fixing it in correct alignment using screws

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ACL Tear: Orthopedic Treatment

by Administrator 27. April 2017 15:47

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Flexor Tendon Injuries: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 25. April 2017 07:26

Tendons join the muscles to the bone and are responsible for the various hand movements. The tendons located on top of the fingers are known as extensor tendons and help to straighten the fingers. On the other hand, tendons located on the palm side are known as flexor tendons and assist in bending the fingers. Any injury in the hand can affect the flexor tendons and make thumb or finger movements difficult.
A flexor tendon injury can cause damage to the nerves in the fingers as well. In serious injuries, the blood vessels also get cut leaving the finger with no blood supply.

Causes

  • Sports injuries while wrestling or playing football
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Deep cuts on the hands or arms
  • ‘Jersey Finger’, where one player gets hold of other’s jersey and a finger gets pulled

Symptoms

  • Inability to bend the finger
  • A visible injury on the palm
  • Discomfort and pain while bending the finger
  • Numbing sensation in the fingertip
  • Tenderness along the palm

Diagnosis

  • A thorough physical examination of the patient’s hand may be done by the orthopedic doctor
  • The patient may be asked to make certain finger movements so that the extent of injury can be assessed
  • The patient’s hand may also be tested for sensation
  • The doctor may conduct examination to rule out injuries of the nerves and blood vessels
  • Imaging tests such as X-Rays may provide a clear picture of the injury and damage

Treatment

Generally, a tendon that has been cut will not heal without surgery. However, a partially torn tendon can be repaired with the use of splint or physical therapy.

Non-surgical treatment

  • Application of ice packs immediately after a cut on the hand may be beneficial
  • Keeping the hand in an elevated position to stop blood flow
  • The doctor may give an injection and administer antibiotics to prevent infection
  • The injured finger is placed in a splint to protect the hand from further damage before surgery

Surgical treatment

  • Surgery for a flexor tendon injury may be performed within ten days of the injury
  • A dressing and splint may be applied after the surgery
  • The fingers and wrist may be positioned in a bent arrangement to keep tension off the repair
  • Physical therapy may be recommended after surgery to regain normal hand motion
  • Long-term stiffness after flexor tendon injuries is common
  • In certain patients, another surgery may have to be performed to treat the scar tissue and help the patient use his hand normally

Get in touch with an hand and wrist doctors at OrthoTexas in case you suspect a Flexor Tendon Injury. For an appointment, call at (214) 618 – 5502.

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

by Administrator 22. April 2017 13:20

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Little League Elbow: Orthopedic Plano

by Administrator 18. April 2017 04:28

Little League Elbow, also called Medial Apophysitis, is a common injury in young children who play active sport. Repeated action of throwing a ball may stress the tendons and ligaments that support the elbow joint may get stressed beyond their limits resulting in this condition. The elbow is a type of a hinge and pivot joint comprising of the humerus, ulna and the radius. Many muscles, connective tissues and nerves cross each other at this joint. The condition can be serious if the ligaments or tendon gets torn and detached from the bone. It may result in permanent deformity or stunted growth in the child.

Causes

  • Playing a high intensity sport at a young age
  • Playing one sport for a prolonged period of time, specifically the ones that involve a lot of throwing action
  • Use of faulty technique during and lack of conditioning after a sport
  • Overuse of the joint by pitchers, fielders etc.

Symptoms

  • Sharp pain in the bony protrusion on the inner side of the elbow
  • A feeling of catching or locking of the joint
  • Limited range of motion
  • Inability to perform basic tasks that involve use of the joint
  • Tenderness and inflammation
  • A pop may be felt when the joint is moved
  • Development of bone spurs
  • Arthritis may set in early childhood

Diagnosis

  • X-ray imaging of the affected joint to analyze bone damage, if any
  • Palpation to check for visible symptoms
  • Range of motion may be tested

Treatment

  • Resting the affected joint by keeping the arm at chest level
  • All sport activities need to be avoided for some time
  • The patient should learn to practise throwing in such a way that it does not stress the joint much
  • Ice packs may be applied at regular intervals to get relief from pain and inflammation
  • Surgery may be recommended when conservative methods do not give satisfactory results. This may be performed if the child is above 12 years of age.  During the procedure, the loose pieces of tissue and bone fragments may be removed.
  • Surgical grafting of the tendons or ligaments to repair the damage
  • The connective tissues may be reattached or tightened surgically to improve the condition
  • Regular physical therapy to strengthen the core, arms , shoulder and back that lend support to the joint
  • Pain killers and anti-inflammatory medicines may be prescribed by the doctor

The surgeons at OrthoTexas offer complete treatment for Little League Elbow and other orthopedic conditions. For an appointment, call at (972) 985 – 1072.

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Orthopedic Treatment For Plantar Fibromatosis

by Administrator 15. April 2017 03:54

Plantar Fibromatosis is a rare medical disorder that marks the beginning of the growth of benign tumors under the foot. These tumor-like nodules are referred to as plantar fibromas. They develop on the underside of the foot or the plantar surface. The heel is connected to the bottom of the foot by a band of connective tissue, plantar fascia. The tumors grow slowly and are made up of excess collagen. The condition may affect both the feet (Ledderhorse’s diseae) and is not likely to get resolved on its own. It affects males more than females and is relatively widespread among the Caucasian race. 

Causes

  • Damage caused to the plantar fascia
  • Age- people in the age group of 50 and above are at a greater risk. Highest incidence is observed in men above 70 years of age
  • Prolonged use of anti-seizure medicines
  • Congenital- this condition may affect a person at the time of birth
  • Genetic disorder
  • Diabetes Mellitus
  • Alcohol consumption
  • Liver dysfunction
  • Epilepsy
  • Thyroid dysfunction
  • Standing  for very long
  • Excessive intake of vitamin C

Symptoms

  • Pain and discomfort while walking
  • As the tumors grow, bending the toes may become difficult
  • A prominent and hard lump can be seen near the foot arch 
  • Multiple Fibromas - There may be more than one lump in the foot 
  • Discomfort while wearing shoes
  • Barefoot movement may be painful

Diagnosis

  • Analysis of the patient’s medical and family history. The record of all the medications taken by the patient may be taken into consideration
  • Detailed examination of the existing condition and the symptoms reported
  • X-ray imaging may be required in most cases
  • MRI and CT scan may reveal condition of soft tissues and the exact location, size and shape of the tumor

Treatment

  • If the tumor is small and does not interfere with the daily activities of the patient, the focus of treatment is on alleviating pressure on the foot. Orthotic devices like pads, night splints, shoe inserts that support the arch may be used. Reduction in pressure helps to shrink the tumor
  • Medicated gel may be used to reduce the size of the fibromas
  • Injecting cortisones may help in some cases
  • Surgical removal of the fibromas
  • Use of crutches for a few weeks post-surgery may be recommended
  • Maintaining healthy body weight, use of comfortable shoes, plenty of fluid intake and regular stretching exercise may be recommended to prevent the condition from recurring or aggravating
  • Activity modification- Standing for too long or walking on hard surfaces may pressurize the foot. Such activities should be avoided
To know more about treatment options available for Plantar Fibromatosis, call the foot and ankle specialists at OrthoTexas. We can be contacted at (972) 899 - 4679.

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