Common Football Injuries

by Administrator 25. February 2017 09:40

 

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Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 19. February 2017 12:17

Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis or SCFE is a hip condition that mostly occurs in teenagers.  The hip is a ball and socket joint in which the head of the thigh bone fits into the socket of the large pelvic bone called acetabulum. The thigh bone grows along two growth plates (physis) that are found at each end of the femur. The growth head located at the upper end of the femur solidifies to become the femoral head and is also referred to as the epiphysis. In case of SCFE, this epiphysis gets displaced as the head of the thigh bone slips backwards. The condition may take some time to develop and is more prevalent in teenage boys. Timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment is necessary to prevent future complications like Hip Arthritis.

SCFE can be classified as follows:

  • Stable SCFE - The joint feels slightly unstable and the patient may be able to move around with some help
  • Unstable SCFE - The patient is unable to bear body weight even if walking aids such as a walker or crutches are used. This condition may also become a potential cause of Avascular Necrosis in the hip bone.

Causes

  • A sudden fall
  • Major trauma caused to the hip or pelvis joint
  • Hereditary factors
  • Being obese or over weight
  • Metabolic disorders such as hyperthyroidism
  • In some cases, a person may develop SCFE over a period of time even with no previous record of physical injury

Symptoms

  • Pain may be felt in the hip, groin, knee or thigh post injury
  • Stiffness
  • Unstable joint
  • Inability to bear body weight
  • In most cases, only one side of the hip joint is affected. However, in patients below the age of 10 years, the chances of both sides being affected are higher
  • The affected leg may appear shorter and turned outwards compared to the normal one
  • Change in gait
  • Physical activity may exaggerate the symptoms

Diagnosis

  • Medical history, family traits and symptoms may be taken into account
  • Detailed clinical evaluation may be required to check range of motion in the affected leg
  • The patient’s gait may be observed
  • X-ray imaging may be conducted to analyze bone structure and locate the femoral head

Treatment

The femoral head or epiphysis is stabilized through a surgical procedure in all cases. It may be carried out as follows:

  • In case of stable SCFE, in situ fixation is carried out by fixing the femoral head using a metal screw. As the growth plate grows and the screw gets fused within it
  • In case of unstable SCFE, a large incision is made in the hip joint and the displaced bone head is brought back to the correct anatomical position. It is held in place using two screws which eventually fuse within the joint
  • In cases where in the patient is likely to develop SCFE in the opposite hip as well, in situ fixation may be preformed to eliminate the risk
  • Physical therapy may be recommended post surgery
  • The patient may be advised to use crutches for a few weeks to allow the joint to heal
  • Regular follow ups and some repeat X-rays may be required to monitor the joint condition for 1-2 years after surgery

Visit the joint doctors at OrthoTexas for complete treatment of Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis and other disorders of the hip. To schedule an appointment with the orthopedic surgeons in Denton, TX, call at (940) 382-1577.

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Wrist Dislocation: Orthopedic Frisco

by Administrator 15. February 2017 10:38

The wrist joint connects the two bones of the forearm (ulnar and radius) to the smaller bones of the hand. There are eight carpal bones in the hand which are held together and connected to the other bones by ligaments. The eight carpal bones that form the wrist joint are named as the Capitate, Trapezoid, Hamate, Pisiform, Trapezium, Lunate, Scaphoid and Triquetrum. Displacement of any of these bones may result in Wrist Dislocation. The condition may also be accompanied by ligament and nerve damage.

Causes

  • Fall on an outstretched hand
  • Sports injuries
  • Vehicular accidents
  • Physical combat
  • Direct hit on the wrist with a ball while playing or any other object may cause dislocations and fractures
  • Past injuries or hand fractures make the wrist prone to dislocations
  • Workplace accidents

Symptoms

  • Severe pain
  • Visibly deformed wrist joint
  • Swelling and stiffness
  • The joint may feel tender when touched
  • In case of nerve damage, a tingling sensation in the thumb or the fingers may occur
  • Bruising
  • Range of motion may be affected

Diagnosis

  • Detailed observation of the injured hand by an orthopedic doctor
  • Palpation may be used to check for exact point of dislocations and swelling
  • The mode and time of injury may be taken into consideration besides the symptoms, past medical records and injuries, if any
  • X-ray imaging may be required to assess the damage to the bone structure
  • MRI scan may be required in some cases for a better view and if damage to nerve or ligaments is suspected
  • Neurovascular examination of the joint may be done

Treatment

  • Application of ice packs may help to reduce swelling
  • Pain killers may be prescribed
  • Use of a soft bandage for compression and support may be helpful
  • Splinting the wrist and fingers
  • The injured hand should be rested on an elevated surface
  • Simple bracing and cast may be used to reduce the dislocated bones and restore functionality of the joint in case of minor injuries
  • Surgical reduction (putting the displaced bone back in place) may be carried out and the process may involve use of pins, wires and screws to hold the bone in place
  • The hand may be secured using a cast for a few weeks
  • The surgical procedure may be followed by a physical therapy plan to promote strength, stability and restore range of motion
  • Some changes at the work place may be suggested by an occupational therapist for recovery and prevention of future damage to the joint

For comprehensive treatment of Wrist Dislocation, consult OrthoTexas, leading groups of orthopedic doctors and physicians serving Frisco, TX. To request an appointment, call at (214) 618 – 5502.

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Orthopedic Treatment For Twisted Neck

by Administrator 13. February 2017 07:45

Twisting of the neck to one side is medically referred to as Torticollis or wry neck. It is a common condition that occurs when the muscles that hold the neck and aid in its movement are affected. The symptoms may ease out naturally over a few days while it may require longer duration and medical treatment in severe cases.  Twisted Neck is a commonly reported cause of pain in young people, although it may affect anybody irrespective of age or gender. The person may not necessarily have a past history of neck injury or pain.

Causes

  • Acute Torticollis – It occurs when a ligament or muscle in the neck or shoulder is irritated or sprained
  • Carrying heavy bags or load on the shoulder or in one hand
  • Working long on the computer without maintaining a correct posture or eye view
  • Exposure of the neck muscles to the cold
  • Ear infection
  • Not having adequate support under the head and neck while sleeping
  • Cervical Dystonia- muscle spasms in the neck that occur in people above the age of 40 years. It leads to abnormal head and neck movements including Torticollis
  • Sometimes upper throat infections can affect the lymph nodes that may lead to stiff neck and muscle spasms
  • Cervical or head injury
  • Damage to the blood vessels that flow through the neck
  • Could be a side effect of some medications
  • Congenital Defects- the head of the fetus may be wrongly positioned in the womb causing wry neck

Symptoms

  • Pain on one side of the neck
  • Stiffness in the neck
  • Difficulty in turning the neck to the other side
  • Inability to keep the neck straight
  • The muscles on the affected side feel tender or swollen when touched
  • The pain may radiate into the shoulders and upper back
  • Tingling sensation in the neck
  • The head and the chin may tilt in opposite directions
  • Muscle spasms

Diagnosis

  • Analysis of the symptoms and detailed examination of the neck
  • X-ray and other tests may be suggested in case the doctor suspects a serious underlying cause for the existing condition
  • EMG (electromyogram) test may be conducted to locate the affected muscles

Treatment

The symptoms of a twisted neck tend to improve naturally within 24-48 hours. In case they persist longer, the following treatment options may be employed.

  • Some gentle neck exercises may promote movement and flexibility. These may reduce the stiffness
  • Anti-inflammatory medicines and muscle relaxants may be prescribed
  • If the pain is severe in the initial phase, resting the neck for a day or two may be required.
  • Driving should be avoided
  • Some patients may find relief by use of heat pads
  • Gentle traction may be applied
  • Maintain a good posture at work and while standing, sitting or walking
  • Use a firm pillow while sleeping
  • In case of Cervical Dystonia, some medicines may be injected into the neck to paralyze the muscles and stop pain/ spasms
  • Surgery may be recommended if the condition becomes chronic. The procedure aims at lengthening muscles, cutting nerves (to interrupt signals) and fusing some vertebrae in the neck.

The spine specialists at OrthoTexas offer comprehensive treatment for twisted neck and other conditions of the cervical spine. For appointment with orthopedic doctors in Plano, TX, call at (972) 985-1072.

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PCL Injury: Orthopedic Treatment In Carrollton

by Administrator 9. February 2017 13:04

Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is a tough tissue structure with a high tensile strength that essentially controls the positioning of the tibia and the femur. Besides connecting the bones, it stabilizes the knee joint while it rotates in different directions. Any tear or stress in this ligament is termed as PCL injury.

It is not common condition and generally occurs in combination with other ligament injuries and cartilage damages. PCL injury can vary in degree from a mild stretch to complete tear of the ligament, with a piece of the bone being dethatched along with the tissue structure. Sports person who indulge in football, soccer, skiing etc. are at a higher risk of ligament injuries.

Causes

  • Falling on a flexed knee
  • Direct injury or trauma to the shin bone (tibia)
  • Vehicular accidents in which the legs are crushed against the dashboard

Symptoms

  • Mild or sharp knee pain, depending on the grade of injury
  • Swelling and tenderness in the joint
  • Unstable knee joint
  • Inability to walk, stand or bear body weight

Diagnosis

  • The knee specialist may inquire about mode of injury, symptoms as well as the medical history
  • A device called arthrometer may be used to check ligament strength or tightness
  • The patient may be asked to lie on his back while bending the knees. The upper portion of the shin bone is examined through palpation which helps to confirm PCL injury
  • Analysis of the gait
  • X-ray imaging to check for bone damage, if any
  • MRI or CT scan to locate the exact point of tear/stress to the ligament
  • Bone scan may be required in case of chronic PCL injuries. Both the legs are compared to reach a diagnosis
  • The doctor may check for fluid retention or internal bleeding within the joint that may cause pressure to build up
  • Arthroscopy may be used to get a better view of the joint

Treatment

  • Rest the injured knee and avoid any weight bearing or activity that may cause stress
  • Use of ice packs may reduce pain and swelling
  • Slight compression may be applied
  • Keep the leg elevated at chest level while resting
  • Anti-inflammatory medicines may be prescribed for immediate relief
  • Physical therapy may be helpful in stabilizing the joint, aiding in recovery and strengthening
  •  A crutch or a knee brace may be used for supporting the affected joint
  • Surgery may be recommended in high grade injuries which do not respond to conservative methods. If a piece of bone is detached along with the ligament, it may be surgically fastened using pins and screws
  • Torn PCL ligament is surgically replaced by a part of tissue extracted from a donor or by using tissues from the patient’s body (thigh or heel)
  • Minor tissue injuries can be corrected using an arthroscope which enables correction through minor incisions

For diagnosis and treatment of PCL injury, visit the knee specialists at OrthoTexas. To request an appointment, you can call at (972) 492-1334.

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Bowed Legs: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 6. February 2017 04:09

Bowed Legs, or Genu Varum, is a structural deformity of the lower limbs in which the knees are pulled apart while the feet are joined together.  It is commonly observed in toddlers and is evident due to the large spacing between the legs as well as knees. The condition may affect either one or both the legs and usually subsides on its own by the age of 3-4 years.

Causes

  • Congenital defects- Folding of the legs in the mother’s womb may lead to bow leg formation in babies
  • Rickets- A bone disease that occurs due to deficiency of Vitamin D or Calcium and phosphorus
  • Blount’s Disease- Abnormality of the growth plate in tibia
  • Fractures of the leg that have not healed properly

Symptoms

  • Visibly deformed legs that may tend to curve outwards
  • Abnormal gait
  • Symptoms are more apparent  when the child walks or stands
  • Intoeing or inward turning of the feet while walking
  • Tendency to trip while walking
  • If the condition persists in adolescence, it may out stress on the hips, knee, ankle and pelvis

Diagnosis

  • Detailed physical examination of the child, birth history and medical condition, if any
  • The doctor may check if the bowing is symmetrical (occurs in both legs equally) or asymmetrical (one leg bends more than the other). This is done by measuring the distance between the knees while making the child lie on the stomach
  • X-ray imaging may be required to assess the bone structure and underlying cause
  • Blood tests may be done to check for conditions like Rickets

Treatment

  • Regular clinical assessments every few months may be recommended to keep a check on the progress of the condition
  • Bracing of the legs may be helpful if Blount’s Disease is diagnosed during early childhood
  • Specific medication may be prescribed to control effects of Rickets

Surgical intervention may be needed in case the condition worsens and does not subside with conservative treatment. This may include:

  • Tibial Osteotomy- Realigning or reshaping the shin bone and holding it in correct anatomical position using pins, plates, screws etc.
  • Guided Growth- Surgical procedure to stop the growth of the healthy side of the shin bone to facilitate recovery on the damaged side of the leg
  • Physical therapy may be helpful post-surgery to regain strength and stability of the leg
  • The child may be advised to use walker or crutches for some time to avoid weight bearing

For treatment of Bowed Legs and other orthopedic conditions, visit OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment with the orthopedic surgeons in McKinney, TX, you can call at (972) 727 – 9995.

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Fracture after Total Hip Replacement: Orthopedic Carrollton

by Administrator 31. January 2017 10:33

A break or crack in the artificial implant during or after the hip replacement process is termed as a periprosthetic fracture. It may occur in any part of the artificial implant although it is most commonly seen in the stem of the metallic component that is fixed within the femur. Treatment for this condition is surgical and it can be quite complicated as the  patients are generally old in age and the bone structure has already weakened.

Causes

  • A fall on the ground
  • Vehicular accidents that cause high intensity trauma to the joint
  • Direct blow to the leg or hip
  • People suffering from Osteoporosis are at a higher risk
  • Inherent muscular weakness may decrease the stability of the joint and predispose a person to such injuries
  • Osteolysis- The bones may begin to thin out with age and this may lead to the loosening of the femoral stem

Symptoms

  • Severe pain around the hip and thigh
  • Swelling
  • Bruising
  • Discrepancy in the limb length as the injured leg tends to shorten
  • Limited range of motion
  • Inability to bear body weight

Diagnosis

  • Detailed examination of the hip joint
  • Nerve testing to ensure the blood flow to the lower limbs is not affected
  • CT scan may be required to obtain a 3D image of the hip joint
  • Blood tests may be conducted to assess the general health condition of the patient
  • X-ray images of the pelvis, thigh and hip area may be required to analyze the severity of damage to the implant as well as surrounding bones

Treatment

  • Weight bearing should be restricted to avoid stressing the joint
  • Traction may be used in some cases to straighten the leg and keep the bones in place
  • Open Reduction- A surgical procedure that may be recommended if the implant is still secure within the femur. The broken bones are surgically placed back in their position and fastened using screws or pins (internal fixation)
  • Bone graft may be required in some cases as it helps in healing the fracture.
  • Surgical replacement of the damaged implant. This process is called Joint Revision
  • Blood thinning medications may be prescribed post surgery to prevent clotting in the leg or hip
  • Anti-inflammatory medications to relieve pain
  • Physical therapy may be recommended to promote joint movement during recovery phase
  • A hip brace may be worn for a few weeks to prevent stress on the joint

For treatment of periprosthetic fracture and other hip conditions, visit OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment with the hip specialists in Carrollton, TX, call at (972) 492-1334 or visit 4780 North Josey Lane, Carrollton, TX 75010.

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Orthopedic Treatment For Stiff Neck

by Administrator 28. January 2017 19:27

Stiff Neck is a common problem that affects all people irrespective of gender or age. It is characterized by a sprain or strain of the soft tissues in the neck. The neck represents the upper part of the spinal canal that begins at the base of the skull. It comprises of 7 cervical vertebrae that are surrounded by the ligaments, nerves, blood vessels and muscles. Stress or injury to any of these constituent parts may lead to Stiff Neck.

Causes

  • Sleeping in an awkward position may stress the soft tissues
  • Prolonged working on the computer
  • Poor postural habits
  • Stress or anxiety
  • Acute Torticollis- Waking up with the neck twisted on one particular side
  • Carrying heavy weight above the head or on one shoulder
  • Cervical Spondylosis- Wear and tear of neck ligaments due to age and overuse
  • Whiplash- Sudden jerk to the neck caused by an external force or vehicular accident
  • Falls
  • Pinched Nerve
  • Sports injury

Symptoms

  • Pain in the head, neck, shoulders and may radiate down to the arms
  • Stiffness and difficulty in moving the neck
  • Muscle spasms around the neck and shoulders
  • The patient may feel a tingling sensation or pricks in the neck, arms and fingers
  • Numbness in the limbs and upper body
  • The muscles around the neck may feel swollen or tender

Diagnosis

  • Details of the patient’s medical history, lifestyle and occupation may be taken into consideration
  • The patient may be asked to move the neck, shoulder and arms to check for range of motion
  • Palpation may be done to check for swelling
  • X-ray imaging may be required in some cases to diagnose the underlying cause
  • MRI and CT scan may help in identifying injuries to the soft tissue structures

Treatment

In most cases, Stiff Neck is not a serious condition and the symptoms can be managed through conservative treatment methods. These may include the following:

  • Heat pads may be used around the affected area to alleviate stiffness and pain
  • Ice packs may also be applied to prevent inflammation and improve blood circulation
  • Pain killers and anti inflammatory medicines may be prescribed by the orthopedic doctor
  • Avoid using laptop and maintain a good posture till the pain subsides
  • A soft neck collar may be helpful but it should be used only for a couple of days
  • Use a soft  pillow to rest the head
  • Gentle exercises may be helpful in improving flexibility of the neck and upper body

For treatment of Stiff Neck and other medical conditions, visit OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment with the orthopedic doctors in Allen, TX, you can call at (972) 727 - 9995.

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Flexible Flatfoot in Children: Orthopedic Treatment In Frisco

by Administrator 25. January 2017 04:04

Flexible Flatfoot, or Pes Planus, is a condition that causes the arch of the foot to temporarily collapse. The arch is not visible when the child stands and re-appears while sitting or when the foot is left hanging freely. The condition may be congenital and affects both the feet. In most cases, it gets resolved as the child attains the age of 5 years. It is considered serious if the child feels pain or does not develop an arch even after this age.

Flexible Flatfoot usually does not hinder the foot’s movement or ability of the child to participate in physical activities. With the growth of the bones and soft tissue structures, the child tends to develop a normal arch.

Causes

  • Flexible Flatfoot may be an inherited problem
  • A tight Achilles tendon may cause the arch to collapse

Symptoms

  • Pain may be felt at the base of the foot or near the arch
  • Visibly flattened foot while weight bearing
  • Altered gait
  • The child may complain of stiffness or tiredness after a physical activity. He may also feel pain in the legs and knees
  • Shoes may be worn out on the inner side due to the inward tilt of the foot (overpronation)

Diagnosis

  • Detailed examination of the feet to check if the collapse of arch is rigid or flexible
  • Details of the family history may be taken into consideration
  • The doctor may ask the child to stand on toes, sit, walk or stand to check for the deformity
  • X-ray examination may be required to check the bone structure and condition of the Achilles tendon besides other soft tissue structures

Treatment

Treatment for Flexible Flatfoot generally includes conservative methods. Some of them are:

  • Use of orthotic devices or shoe inserts can help in maintaining the arch and relieving the pain
  • Specific stretching exercises may be practised for eliminating the symptoms and improving the functionality of the joint
  • Physical therapy sessions may help to reduce the tightness in the Achilles’ tendon and improve the foot biomechanics
  • Surgery may be recommended if the condition worsens or persists beyond adolescence. It may be done to relieve the tight Achilles tendon
  • Surgical lengthening of the heel bone using a bone graft may be required in some cases

OrthoTexas provides comprehensive diagnosis and treatment for Flexible Flatfoot in children. To schedule an appointment with the foot doctors in Frisco, TX, you can call at (214) 618-5502.

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Pediatric Scoliosis: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 21. January 2017 19:09

Scoliosis can be defined as the development of an abnormal spine curvature due to excessive rotation between the vertebrae. When this condition affects adolescents and children, it is classified as Pediatric Scoliosis. It is most commonly seen in the thoracic region of the spine. Depending upon its cause, the condition can be categorized as:

  • Congenital Scoliosis- This type of scoliosis is present at the time of birth
  • Idiopathic Scoliosis- It has no apparent cause but is diagnosed in children with one or more family members having Scoliosis
  • Neuromuscular Scoliosis- Patients suffering from medical conditions that cause abnormalities in the spinal nerves and muscles develop this category of Scoliosis

Pediatric Scoliosis may range from mild (less than 25 degrees of curvature) to severe (more than 45 degree curvature) with total spinal deformity. The former one generally does not require treatment except for regular monitoring to check the progression of the condition. Severe cases of Pediatric Scoliosis however need proper treatment.

Causes

  • Genetic factors may promote development of Pediatric Scoliosis
  • Improper development of the vertebrae or inability of the bones to fuse properly in the embryonic stage.
  • Trauma caused to the child at the time of birth or during the gestation period may also be a cause
  • Neuromuscular disorders such as Muscular Dystrophy, Cerebral Palsy, Spina Bifida etc. may result in abnormal spine curvature as in this case the muscles are weak and cannot lend stability to the spinal cord
  • Strain on the abdominal muscles may cause the spine to develop an abnormal curve

Symptoms

  • The typical symptoms of Pediatric Scoliosis may be one or more of the following
  • Unevenness in the level of right and left shoulder
  • The child may tend to lean to one side of the body
  • The hip and waist may be elevated on one side
  • The child may limp while walking
  • Fatigue may be experienced while performing physical tasks
  • Some cases may show changes in skin color around the affected part of the spine

Diagnosis

  • A detailed evaluation of the child’s medical and family history
  • Physical examination to check for the changes or abnormalities in the shape as well as angle of the chest, legs, shoulders, hips, legs, waist and pelvis
  • Adam's forward bend test - The child may be asked to bend forward to view the shape of the spine and changes in rib cage, if any
  • The length of the limbs may be measured
  • X-ray imaging may be required cases to assess the bone structure

Treatment

  • The treatment option depends on the degree of curvature and the child’s age which indicates the growth years remaining to attain structural maturity.
  • Regular monitoring for 4-6 months may be recommended for mild cases of Pediatric Scoliosis to check if the condition is stable or progressive
  • Customized braces may be worn under the clothes to keep the spine stable. It may help to prevent the condition from progressing and is generally recommended if the curve is between 25 and 45 degrees
  • A Scoliotic curve that is progressive and larger than 45 degrees may require surgical intervention. This is done to fuse the affected vertebrae in order to stop the progression of the condition
  • Surgical realignment of the vertebrae may be done and the spine may be held in a normal position by inserting metal rods, screws or pins

For diagnosis and treatment of Pediatric Scoliosis, visit OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment with the spine specialists in Plano, TX, you can call at (972) 985 – 1072.

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