Proximal Humerus Fracture: Orthopedic Plano

by Administrator 16. June 2017 07:37

Proximal Humerus Fracture is a common type of injury of the shoulder joint that is prevalent in the elderly people. It is essentially a broken or cracked shoulder bone. This joint is made up of the shoulder blade (scapula), upper part of the humerus and the collar bone (clavicle). Tissues, ligaments, tendons keep the bones connected and help in movement of the arm. These bones together form 3 important joints- the sternoclavicular, the glenohumeral and the acromioclavicular joints. Proximal Humerus Fracture is a  type of fracture that damages the upper part of the humerus bone and is most commonly observed  in women and elderly people who suffer from poor bone health.

Causes

  • A direct fall on the shoulder
  • Vehicular accidents
  • Sports injuries
  • Overuse injuries
  • Weakness of the joint and bones due to ageing
  • Physical combat or collision
  • Injury to the chest may cause fracture in the scapula
  • Forced twisting of the arm may cause displacements and soft tissue stress
  • Seizures or electric shocks can cause displacements of the joint
  • Lifting heavy objects or overhead
  • Osteoporosis

Symptoms

  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • A visible bony bump at the point of injury or fracture may develop
  • Limited range of motion remains intact
  • Bruising and discoloration around the shoulder
  • The hands and arm may turn cold if there is damage to blood vessels or nerves
  • The joint may look deformed
  • A grinding sensation when the shoulder is moved
  • Inability to move the shoulder or arm
  • The upper limb feels weak
  • In case of an open fracture, a part of the bone may be sticking out of the skin

Diagnosis

  • Details of the patient’s medical history, mode and time of injury as well as symptoms may be taken into account
  • Detailed physical examination of the injured joint and arm to check for visible symptoms and severity of injury
  • The peripheral pulses need to be checked to diagnose loss of blood supply to any part of the injured limb
  • X-ray imaging is required to analyze the changes or damage to bone structure. It helps diagnose fractures and displacements if any
  • CT scan or MRI scan may be required to assess the damage to soft tissue structures and blood vessels or nerves

Treatment

  • In case the bone is not badly broken and has not shifted from its position much, it can be treated by immobilizing the joint using a sling
  • Ice packs applied at regular intervals help reduce pain and swelling
  • Pain killers and anti-inflammatory medicines may be prescribed
  • Manual reduction of a displaced bone may be done as an initial step and it is then secured using a shoulder brace
  • Surgical fixation of the broken or displaced bone parts using metal screws, pins and plates
  • Surgical repair of tendons and ligaments that hold the joint may be required
  • Elderly people whose bones are weak and get damaged severely may require a shoulder replacement procedure
  • Physical therapy sessions may be required to restore function and strength of the joint post treatment

Consult the physicians at OrthoTexas to know more about the treatment options available for Proximal Humerus Fracture. To schedule an appointment, call at (972) 985 - 1072.

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Shoulder Pain

by Administrator 16. May 2017 09:00

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Separated Shoulder: Orthopedic Treatment In Plano, TX

by Administrator 11. June 2015 05:32

A Separated Shoulder, also known as an Acromioclavicular Joint Separation or A/C Separation, is in injury causing damage to the ligaments joining the shoulder blade and collarbone. It is usually a tissue or ligament injury but, in some cases, may also involve a broken bone. It may occur due to a fall or direct hit at the top of the shoulder joint.

Depending upon its severity, Shoulder Separation can be classified as:

  • Type 1: A mild sprain or stretching in the ligaments in and around the joint.
  • Type 2: The ligament is completely torn and the collarbone gets partially displaced.
  • Type 3 to 6: Severe sprain with tearing of the muscles across the shoulder and neck. The Separated Shoulder may appear to be lower than the other one.

Causes

  • Direct blow to the top of the shoulder
  • Fall onto the joint
  • Accidental collisions in contact sports, such as rugby or hockey
  • Motor vehicle accidents

Symptoms

  • Pain at the top of the shoulder joint
  • Swelling and numbness
  • Visible bruises and discoloration at the site of injury
  • Tenderness between the collarbone and shoulder
  • Upward pointing lump at the top of the joint
  • Weakness in the affected shoulder or arm
  • Restricted range of motion

Diagnosis

To diagnose a Separated Shoulder, the orthopedic doctor may conduct a physical examination to look for a deformity in the joint. He may also recommend an X-ray, with the patient holding weights to put slight stress on the A/C joint and confirm the extent of the condition. The doctor devises a treatment plan after diagnosing the severity of the condition.

Treatment

  • Medications: The orthopedic doctor may prescribe certain anti-inflammatory medications to relieve pain and tenderness in the shoulder.
  • Rest: Taking ample rest and avoiding activities that may strain the joint can also help to ease the symptoms.
  • Shoulder Brace: The patient may also be suggested to wear a shoulder brace or cast to support the affected joint and restrict its movement and promote healing.
  • Ice Packs: Applying an ice pack for 15 to 20 minutes on the affected area can also help to compress swelling and eliminate pain.
  • Physical Therapy: Once the pain has subsided, performing stretching and strengthening exercises may help to restore the strength and mobility of the shoulder.
  • Surgery: If pain persists or the Shoulder Separation is severe, the patient might be suggested to undergo surgery. During the procedure, the shoulder surgeon joins the torn ligaments and relocates injured bones.

For complete diagnosis and treatment of Separated Shoulder, visit OrthoTexas, Plano. To schedule an appointment with the orthopedic surgeon, you can call at (972) 985 – 1072.

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Shoulder Pain: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 17. February 2015 07:14

The shoulder is the most versatile joint of the human body and it helps in the forward and backward movement of the arm. Shoulder joint provides mobility, however it is highly susceptible to injuries. Any tear, inflammation, fracture or dislocation in any of the shoulder bones, ligaments, tissues and tendons can result in pain in the joint.

Causes

  • Shoulder Arthritis
  • Poor Posture
  • Bursitis
  • Bone Spurs
  • Shoulder Dislocation
  • Shoulder Separation
  • Collarbone Fracture
  • Overuse Of Shoulder Muscles
  • Rotator Cuff Tears
  • Pinched Nerve
  • Frozen Shoulder
  • Unstable Shoulder Joint
  • Whiplash
  • Tendinitis
  • Impingement
  • Sprains And Strains
  • Torn Cartilage
  • Tendon Rupture
  • Repetitive Use or Injury to the Surrounding Muscles

Symptoms

  • Numbness and tingling sensation in the shoulder
  • Visible deformity and discoloration
  • Swelling
  • Muscle weakness and stiffness
  • Pain and clicking sound while moving the arm
  • Feeling of popping or grinding
  • Inability to move the arm

Diagnosis

To diagnose the underlying cause of shoulder pain, the orthopedic doctor will physically examine the joint and inquire about the patient’s medical history. He may also recommend certain imaging tests such as X-rays and CT scans to determine the extent of the injury or the possibility of a fracture.

Treatment

  • Medications: The orthopedic doctor may prescribe non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications to reduce pain and inflammation.
  • Injections: If the pain is acute and persistent, the patient may find relief with an injection. This is particularly helpful if the shoulder pain is due to Arthritis.
  • Heat Or Ice Packs: Pain to the shoulder due to sport injuries can be relieved with the help of heat or ice packs. Applying them on the affected area helps to relieve compression from the nerves and reduces swelling.
  • Sling Or Braces: These can be worn to provide support and stability to the shoulder. It can help to relax the muscles and allow them to heal.
  • Physical Therapy: Once the swelling and tenderness has subsided, the patient may need to undergo physical therapy sessions for complete recovery. The stretching and strengthening exercises help to restore the normal range of motion of the shoulder.
  • Surgery: It is usually recommended only if shoulder pain is caused due to some underlying nerve problem.

For comprehensive diagnosis and treatment of shoulder pain you can visit OrthoTexas, Plano, TX. To schedule an appointment, you can call at (972) 985 – 1072 or visit us at 4031 West Plano Parkway Suite 100, Plano, TX 75093.

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Orthopedic Treatment For Shoulder Labral Tear

by Administrator 26. August 2014 07:39

Shoulder Labral Tear is a painful condition and is common among athletes. The Labrum is a cartilaginous ring that surrounds the shoulder socket and the bicep tendon goes through the shoulder joint and attaches to the top of this small structure. Any repeated activity or trauma can lead to the damage of labrum and this tear is common among sports persons involved in overhead throws such as volleyball, baseball, etc.

Causes

  • Overuse of the shoulder
  • Falling on outstretched hand
  • Ageing
  • Traumatic event that leads to dislocation
  • A direct blow to the shoulder

Symptoms

  • Pain in the shoulder joint
  • Catching sensation during shoulder movement
  • Clicking or popping sound
  • Sense of instability that makes shoulder feel loose
  • Pain while doing regular activities
  • Loss of strength
  • Pain with overhead activities
  • Decreased range of motion

Diagnosis

If you are experiencing shoulder pain you should consult an orthopedic surgeon for immediate medical care. The surgeon will examine the shoulder to confirm the injury and its extent by checking the range of motion and asking questions about the kind of injury you suffered. Often X-ray is recommended to rule out fracture in the shoulder and to get a clearer picture of the injury. Patients are advised to go for an MRI scan to confirm the tear of the labrum or biceps tendon. Orthopedic surgeons often conduct a full diagnosis and confirm the patient’s medical history to confirm the tear before deciding on the treatment method to be used.

Treatment

Shoulder Labral Tear can be treated non-surgically and surgically depending upon the extent of damage. To control pain and inflammation, physicians often recommend rest and certain anti-inflammatory medications. A physical therapist helps in easing pain and inflammation by using heat or ice. Patient can also benefit by an array of exercises that improve the motion in the shoulder and the nearby joints and muscles. Even strengthening exercises help in improving the strength and controlling shoulder blade muscles. After four-six weeks of therapy treatment, patients are often able to get back to normal activities. If the non-surgical methods do not work, then the last resort is surgery. Orthopedic surgeons fully assess the situation and if non surgical treatments don’t heal the tear the surgeon recommends surgery.

For diagnosis and treatment of Shoulder Labral Tear in Plano, visit the orthopedic doctors at OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment, call at (972) 985-1072.

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Orthopedic Treatment For Shoulder Separation

by Administrator 12. September 2013 10:10

Contrary to common perception, a shoulder separation does not affect the shoulder joint, but instead affects the acromioclavicular joint (AC joint), which is located at the intersection of the collarbone and the shoulder blade. Such a separation is commonly caused by a fall, which damages the ligament that protects the AC joint, hence resulting in a separation between the collarbone and the wingbone. In severe cases, the ligament might be completely torn, causing the wingbone to descend with the weight of the arm.

The symptoms of shoulder separation involve:

  • Bruising or swelling in the shoulder
  • Restricted shoulder movement
  • An unexplained bump at the top of the shoulder
  • Shoulder pain that intensifies with movement
  • Weakness in the affected arm

If you experience shoulder pain that you suspect might be associated with separation, you can visit OrthoTexas, Plano for diagnosis. This usually involves an X-ray examination to identify the location of injury. Holding a weight in your hand can help to make the deformity more prominent, aiding in the diagnosis. The first step in the treatment of shoulder separation is pain management, which can be done by administering medications, or adopting conservative treatment techniques like rest, ice, compression, and elevation.

In most cases, the aforementioned non-surgical treatment options are sufficient to restore normal functioning in the affected joint. Even though the deformity might still persist, the pain is likely to be alleviated. Reasons for persistent pain might be the development of arthritis, friction between the bone ends during motion, and injury to the cushioning cartilage between the joint ends. Cases of shoulder separation which are accompanied with persistent pain or severe deformity might need surgical treatment.

Your joint doctor at OrthoTexas, Plano, can help you in deciding whether it would be advisable for you to wait and see if normalcy is restored in the joint, or if you should opt for immediate surgery. The most common surgery for shoulder separation involves trimming the end of the collarbone back to its original position, to prevent friction between this bone and the acromion. In patients with severe deformity, surgery can be performed to reconstruct the torn ligaments that join the collarbone to the wingbone.

By opting to get your shoulder separation treated at OrthoTexas, you can benefit from a holistic treatment plan that will extend well beyond your surgery. Our physical therapists and occupational therapists shall help you to restore motion in your shoulder, and rebuild strength and flexibility.

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