Orthopedic Treatment For Plantar Fibromatosis

by Administrator 15. April 2017 03:54

Plantar Fibromatosis is a rare medical disorder that marks the beginning of the growth of benign tumors under the foot. These tumor-like nodules are referred to as plantar fibromas. They develop on the underside of the foot or the plantar surface. The heel is connected to the bottom of the foot by a band of connective tissue, plantar fascia. The tumors grow slowly and are made up of excess collagen. The condition may affect both the feet (Ledderhorse’s diseae) and is not likely to get resolved on its own. It affects males more than females and is relatively widespread among the Caucasian race. 

Causes

  • Damage caused to the plantar fascia
  • Age- people in the age group of 50 and above are at a greater risk. Highest incidence is observed in men above 70 years of age
  • Prolonged use of anti-seizure medicines
  • Congenital- this condition may affect a person at the time of birth
  • Genetic disorder
  • Diabetes Mellitus
  • Alcohol consumption
  • Liver dysfunction
  • Epilepsy
  • Thyroid dysfunction
  • Standing  for very long
  • Excessive intake of vitamin C

Symptoms

  • Pain and discomfort while walking
  • As the tumors grow, bending the toes may become difficult
  • A prominent and hard lump can be seen near the foot arch 
  • Multiple Fibromas - There may be more than one lump in the foot 
  • Discomfort while wearing shoes
  • Barefoot movement may be painful

Diagnosis

  • Analysis of the patient’s medical and family history. The record of all the medications taken by the patient may be taken into consideration
  • Detailed examination of the existing condition and the symptoms reported
  • X-ray imaging may be required in most cases
  • MRI and CT scan may reveal condition of soft tissues and the exact location, size and shape of the tumor

Treatment

  • If the tumor is small and does not interfere with the daily activities of the patient, the focus of treatment is on alleviating pressure on the foot. Orthotic devices like pads, night splints, shoe inserts that support the arch may be used. Reduction in pressure helps to shrink the tumor
  • Medicated gel may be used to reduce the size of the fibromas
  • Injecting cortisones may help in some cases
  • Surgical removal of the fibromas
  • Use of crutches for a few weeks post-surgery may be recommended
  • Maintaining healthy body weight, use of comfortable shoes, plenty of fluid intake and regular stretching exercise may be recommended to prevent the condition from recurring or aggravating
  • Activity modification- Standing for too long or walking on hard surfaces may pressurize the foot. Such activities should be avoided
To know more about treatment options available for Plantar Fibromatosis, call the foot and ankle specialists at OrthoTexas. We can be contacted at (972) 899 - 4679.

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Congenital Vertical Talus: Orthopedic Treatment In Flower Mound

by Administrator 22. February 2017 02:14

Vertical Talus is a foot deformity that occurs at the time of birth. It is a rare condition that affects the talus, a small bone that is placed between the lower leg bones (fibula and tibia) and the calcaneus (heel bone) to form the ankle joint. This bone acts an important node between the foot and the leg that enables transfer of body weight on to the foot while walking and other physical activities. Congenital Vertical Talus disrupts the formation of the talus bone which in turn displaces the other two bones of the lower leg that then shift on top of the talus. Either one or both the feet may get affected. This condition is also a major cause of Flatfoot formation in newborns. It may lead to serious disability in later life, if left untreated.

Causes

  • Neuromuscular disorders in the baby
  • Spina bifida
  • Neurofibromatosis
  • Arthrogryposis
  • Genetic mutation of a set of genes may be responsible

Symptoms

  • The forefoot tends to point upwards
  • The forefoot may turn up to touch the shin bone
  • Absence of foot arch ( Flatfoot )
  • The base or bottom of the foot may be turned outwards which is why this condition is also referred to as the ‘rocker bottom’
  • Pain is generally not felt
  • Foot may be stiff
  • Abnormal gait
  • Callouses may develop if the child starts walking with this condition

Diagnosis

  • Congenital Vertical Talus may be diagnosed before birth if an ultrasound is performed
  • Detailed clinical examination of the foot to check for the symptoms of deformity and degree of bone deformity
  • X-ray imaging to assess the bone structure
  • Some lab tests may be recommended
  • MRI or CT scan to asses the condition of the surrounding soft tissue structures

Treatment

  • Casting the affected foot in a brace may help correct the deformity in early stages of life
  • Regular stretching and gentle exercises prescribed by a physical therapist may be helpful to restore the correct anatomical shape of the foot and improving its flexibility
  • Surgery may be recommended after the child attains 10-12 months of age, if the conservative treatment fails to give results. It may be done to realign the bones and fasten them using pins and screws
  • The ligaments and tendons may be lengthened surgically to facilitate the movement of the ankle joint
  • The foot may be immobilized in a cast for a couple of weeks post  surgery to aid recovery
  • The child is advised to get regular checks done to monitor his/her growth post treatment
  • Special walking boot may be used to improve the condition and prevent reoccurrence


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Pigeon Toes (Intoeing): Orthopedic Flower Mound

by Administrator 19. October 2016 04:26

Pigeon Toes (Intoeing) is a physical ailment which involves turning of the feet inwards. It may affect either one or both the feet. The condition may develop in the early phase of childhood or may become apparent in later stages when the child starts walking. In most cases, Intoeing can heal itself naturally over the time as the child grows. However, in severe cases, treatment from an orthopedic doctor is required. In most cases the patient responds to conservative methods of treatment. For the others, surgery is required.

Causes

  • Gestational problems- The child may not get adequate space in the uterus which causes the legs to turn inwards
  • Internal Tibial Torsion- The shinbone is turned inwards. This is generally the cause if Intoeing occurs in the first 2 years of life
  • Medial Femoral Torsion or Anteversion- The thigh bone tends to turn inwards causing foot deformity which becomes apparent at the age of 4-5 years
  • Other disorders: Neuromuscular disorders such as Cerebral Palsy may also be a cause of the condition
  • Genetic factors: Intoeing can also be caused due to genetic factors

Symptoms

  • Visible deformity
  • Abnormal gait
  • Difficulty in walking and running due to lack of balance
  • The child is easily fatigued and may stumble very often
  • Difficulty in wearing normal shoes
  • Pain may be felt during activity
  • Swelling

Diagnosis

  • A detailed examination of the symptoms, family history and the foot may be conducted
  • X-ray imaging may be required to check the position of the bones and soft tissues
  • The range of motion may be assessed through physical tests

Treatment

  • Bracing- The child may be asked to wear a night brace or a removable brace throughout the day to correct the position of the foot. It comprises of a special shoe made with connecting bars that is fixed on the leg. Bracing may be done even after birth if the baby is found to be deformed
  • Orthotic devices- Special shoe inserts may be used to support the affected foot
  • Plaster: Leg and the foot may be fixed in a plaster for a specific period of time.
  • Surgery: The orthopedic doctors may recommend a surgery if the condition exists beyond 9-10 years of age. The procedure involves resetting of the tibia or the femur as well as the foot bones to improve the shape and create a proper gait.

Visit OrthoTexas for comprehensive diagnosis and treatment of Pigeon Toes. To schedule an appointment with the orthopedic doctor in Flower Mound, TX you can call at (972) 899 – 4679.

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Lisfranc Fracture: Orthopedic Flower Mound, TX

by Administrator 4. October 2016 10:29

Lisfranc fracture refers to a break in the bones that connect the mid foot to the forefoot. This part comprises of a group of bones and connective tissues called ligaments that form the arch on top of the foot. Five long bones called metatarsals extend out from the mid foot to the toes. The arch not only supports the foot while walking, but also helps to transfer the pressure exerted by the leg muscles to the forefoot. The lisfranc complex is important to maintain a proper gait and ensure even distribution of body weight through the lower extremities.

Lisfranc fracture may affect one or more joints in the foot and can be accompanied by a ruptured ligament. It is a serious injury that should be treated immediately as it may take months before the patient can regain complete functionality of the limb. Severe injuries may result in a permanent loss of arch (Flat Foot) or cartilage and Arthritis.

Causes

  • Sudden twisting of the foot
  • Sports injuries which may occur due to falling while the foot is flexed downwards
  • A fall from a height can severely fracture or dislocate the bones
  • Vehicular accident
  • If a heavy or large object falls directly on the foot
  • Diabetes and neurological defects may increase the chances of such injuries

Symptoms

  • Swelling may occur on the top of the foot
  • Pain may increase with movement
  • Bruising, accompanied with discoloration above and below the foot
  • Difficulty in bearing weight
  • The foot may appear abnormally wide

Diagnosis

  • Thorough clinical examination of the injured foot and ankle
  • Analysis of the patient’s symptoms, injuries and medical history
  • Palpation may be done by the orthopedic doctor to check for tenderness and dislocations
  • Piano Key Test- the toes are moved up and down to see if it causes pain
  • Single limb heel rise test to check if the patient can stand on tip toes without pain
  • X-ray imaging to evaluate changes in alignment of the Lisfranc joint
  • MRI and CT scan may be done to obtain cross-section images of the foot and identify damage to soft tissues

Treatment

  • The foot may be immobilized for a few weeks using a cast. The patient may not be allowed to put weight on the foot. After the immobilization period, the cast may be replaced with a removable one and slight weigh bearing may be permitted
  • Ice packs may be applied during the initial period to reduce pain and swelling
  • The injured foot should be kept elevated to compress swelling
  • Internal fixation of the broken or dislocated bones may be done. In this, the bones are put back in place and held together using metal screws and plates
  • Surgical fusion of the damaged bones so that they are allowed to grow back into one single bone mass. This is done in case of severe injuries when internal fixation is not possible
  • Surgical repair of torn or stretched ligaments may also be recommended in some cases

We, at OrthoTexas, offer complete diagnosis and treatment for lisfranc (midfoot) fracture. To schedule an appointment with the foot and ankle specialists in Flower Mound, TX, you can call us at (972) 899 – 4679 or visit 4951 Long Prairie Rd, Suite 100, Flower Mound, TX 75028.

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Dupuytren’s Contracture: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 9. September 2016 09:10

Dupuytren’s Contracture is a physical disorder of the hands which restricts complete straightening of the fingers. The tissue layer beneath the skin may get thickened into clots which pulls the fingers towards the palm. The condition may have a severe effect on the day-to-day activities of the patient, such as lifting objects. Also, known as Viking’s Disease, it is most commonly observed in the ring and little finger. The disorder has a slow level of progression and often does not cause any serious problems.

Causes

  • Hereditary factors
  • Excessive alcohol consumption may be a potential cause
  • Diabetes
  • Seizures may result in such abnormalities
  • Ageing
  • Smoking increases the risk of developing the condition

Symptoms

  • Presence of thick lumps or nodules under the skin of the palm. When pressed, these lumps may feel tender but do not cause pain
  • Difficulty in grasping objects
  • Fingers may be flexed towards the palm
  • Limited range of motion
  • Irritation and burning sensation may occur, in case of inflammation of the tendons in the hand

Diagnosis

  • Clinical evaluation of the affected hand may reveal the presence of Dupuytren’s Contracture
  • Palpation may be done to assess the thickened tissue cords beneath the palm
  • The doctor may check the range of motion of the hand
  • Specific devices may be used to measure the level of contracture

Treatment

  • Enzyme Therapy- Injecting some specific enzymes (collagenase) into the soft tissues of the hand may provide relief and improve motion as it dissolves the thickened cords
  • Corticosteroids may be injected to arrest the progression of the disease
  • Needle Aponeurotomy - a needle may be used to puncture the thickened tissue cords and manual manipulation may be done to straighten the fingers.
  • Surgical correction of the tissues may be required if the condition progresses rapidly. In the procedure, the doctor may remove the lumps and perform skin grafting to close the wound.
  • Post-surgery, the patient may be advised to keep the affected hand elevated to prevent swelling.
  • Physical therapy may help to restore strength and flexibility of the hand and fingers.

The hand and wrist doctors at OrthoTexas offer comprehensive treatment for Dupuytren’s Contracture and other orthopedic conditions. To schedule an appointment, call at (972) 899-4679 or visit 4951 Long Prairie Rd, Suite 100, Flower Mound, TX 75028.

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Talus Fracture: Orthopedic Treatment In Flower Mound

by Administrator 10. August 2016 09:41

Breaking of the ankle bone (talus) is medically termed as Talus Fracture. The talus connects the leg bone to the foot and lies just above the calcaneus. The subtalar joint formed by talus and the heel bone enables us to walk as well as maintain balance on uneven surfaces. The joint is lined by protective articular cartilage which prevents the bones from rubbing against each other. Talus fracture may occur either in the middle or outer portion of the bone. Such fractures are generally serious and can lead to considerable damage to the joint. If not treated timely, it may eventually lead to complications such as Compartment Syndrome, Post Traumatic Arthritis and Avascular Necrosis.

Causes

  • Automobile accident
  • Falling from a height and landing on the feet
  • Forceful outward pushing of the ankle
  • Sports injuries

Symptoms

  • Inability to bear body weight while standing
  • Swelling
  • Bruising
  • Severe pain
  • Fractured bone may be seen protruding out of the skin
  • The joint may feel tender when touched

Diagnosis

  • Clinical examination of the injured foot
  • The nerve conduction ability and blood supply to different parts of the foot and leg may be checked
  • X-ray imaging may help to determine the location and severity of fracture. It may also reveal the severity of the fracture or any dislocation of the bone
  • CT scan may help to detect damage to soft tissues and minute cracks in the bone

Treatment

The methods of treatment may include one or more of the following.

  • The foot may be put in a soft padded splint to keep it stable
  • The foot needs to be rested while keeping it elevated at chest level
  • Stable fractures with minimal displacement may be treated non-surgically by placing the foot in a cast to avoid putting any pressure on the joint
  • Immobilization may be followed by physical therapy to restore movement, flexibility and strength of the joint as well as the adjoining muscles
  • Medicines may be prescribed to combat pain and inflammation
  • In case of multiple breaks in the bone or greater degree of displacement, surgery may be required. The procedure may involve realigning the bone parts to their actual position. Metal screws and wires may be used to fix the bone to its position.
  • Use of a walking stick or cane may be recommended post surgery
  • Specially designed boots to lift pressure from the talus can be worn for some time

The foot and ankle surgeons at OrthoTexas provide effective treatment for talus fracture. To schedule an appointment with our orthopedic doctors in Flower Mound, TX, you can call at (972) 899 – 4679.

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Ankle Arthritis: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 16. July 2016 11:38

The ankle, or the tibiotalar joint, connects the leg and foot. It comprises of various bones, muscles, blood vessels, tendons and ligaments. The joint bears maximum body weight, helps maintain body balance and absorbs external shocks while running, standing and walking. The bones are protected by a thick cartilage which prevents them from rubbing against each other. Ankle Arthritis is characterized by damage or gradual wearing out of this cartilage.

Listed below are the different types of Arthritis that may affect the ankle joint:

  • Rheumatoid Arthritis- It is a chronic condition which may result in joint inflammation. In this, the body’s immune system starts attacking the synovial membrane which protects the joint
  • Osteoarthritis- This is the most common form of Arthritis which is characterized by the damage caused to the cartilage within the joint. As a result, the bones tend to rub against each other and get damaged
  • Juvenile Arthritis- It is commonly seen in young people less than the age of 16 years
  • Gout- A type of Arthritis that occurs when level of uric acid in the blood increases and starts depositing within the joint spaces in the form of hard crystals 
  • Infectious Arthritis- Bacterial, fungal or viral infection in the blood may lead to this type of Arthritis. It is also known as Septic Arthritis. 
  • Psoriatic Arthritis- A type of arthritis which is accompanied or preceded by a skin disease, Psoriasis

Causes

  • Degeneration of joint due to aging
  • External injury or trauma to the joint may develop Arthritis over a period of time
  • Infection
  • Genetic predisposition
  • Inherent misalignments in bone or joint structure
  • Bone dislocation/fracture
  • Ligament and tendon tear

Symptoms

  • Excruciating pain
  • Loss of movement
  • Swelling
  • The joint may feel tender when touched
  • Visible Deformity
  • Redness
  • Difficulty in weight bearing
  • Stiffness in the joint, particularly in the morning
  • Feeling of warmth around the joint
  • Pain tends to flare up after prolonged or vigorous physical activity

Diagnosis

  • Detailed clinical examination of the joint
  • The orthopedic doctor may analyze the patient’s symptoms and medical history
  • Evaluation of changes in gait
  • X-ray may be conducted to assess bone damage
  • Blood tests to identify the type of Arthritis
  • MRI and CT scan may be done to reveal soft tissue damage

Treatment
The non-surgical methods of treatment may include:

  • Lifestyle modification to reduce activities that aggravate pain
  • Incorporating light exercises to maintain joint and muscle strength
  • Weight loss may be recommended to prevent putting pressure on the joint
  • Ankle foot orthosis (AFO) may be used to improve joint stability
  • Shoe inserts and walking cane may be helpful
  • Physical therapy may also be recommended to increase ankle strength
  • Prescription of anti-inflammatory medicines

Surgical methods may include:

  • Arthroscopic Debridement- removal of damaged cartilage and other parts using arthroscopic techniques
  • Bone fusion or Arthrodesis- The affected bones may be combined together using plates, wires or screws to cease their movement and prevent rubbing against each other. It helps to relieve pain and prevent the condition from worsening.
  • Total ankle replacement or Arthroplasty may be recommended for patients with advanced stage of Ankle Arthritis

For diagnosis and treatment of Ankle Arthritis, visit OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment with the foot and ankle specialists in Flower Mound, TX, you can call at (972) 899 – 4679.

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Distal Humerus Fracture: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 2. July 2016 13:49

Distal humerus fracture refers to a break in the upper arm bone or the humerus. The three bones, humerus, radius and the ulna together, form the elbow joint and the base of the humerus is called the distal humerus. The bones are held together by ligaments, muscles and tendons. The distal humerus fits into the cup shaped part of the ulna and enables the elbow to move or bend. Fractures of the distal humerus are rare and generally occur in association with other arm injuries.

Causes

  • Falling directly on an outstretched hand
  • Vehicular accidents
  • Sports injuries
  • A direct hit to the elbow joint

Symptoms

  • Bruising or skin discoloration
  • Inability to move the elbow
  • The joint may feel unstable
  • The fractured bone may protrude out of the skin, in severe cases
  • Severe pain
  • The area around the joint may be tender to touch
  • Stiffness
  • Swelling, numbness or joint disfigurement may be seen

Diagnosis   

  • Clinical examination of the injured arm to check for the severity of injury
  • Palpation may be done to assess the exact location of tenderness and pain
  • The pulse rate may help to analyze disruption of blood flow to the limb
  • X-ray may be conducted to point out the exact location and extent of damage
  • MRI scan may be required if damage to soft tissues is suspected

Treatment

The treatment of distal humerus fracture may depend upon the type of injury and damage caused to the bone as well as soft tissues. Non-surgical procedures may include:

  • A splint may be used to keep the joint stable during the healing period
  • Cryotherapy- application of ice packs at regular intervals
  • Pain killers and anti-inflammatory medicines may be prescribed to relieve pain
  • Antibiotics may be prescribed in case of infection of an open wound
  • The patient should avoid lifting weights for a few weeks

Surgical procedures may be required in case of an open fracture. The following procedures may be recommended:

  • Using minimally invasive techniques,  metal pins, screws and wires may be inserted into the joint to stabilize the bone
  • Bone Fillers- In case the bone is badly crushed, a piece of bone may be taken from another body part such as pelvis and inserted into the joint. Alternatively, artificial bone mass made up of calcium may be used
  • Surgical replacement of the elbow may be suggested if the joint is damaged beyond repair
  • Physical therapy may be helpful in regaining joint strength and mobility post-surgery

For effective treatment of distal humerus fracture, visit OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment with the orthopedic surgeons in Flower Mound, TX, you can call at (972) 899 – 4679.

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Runner’s Knee: Orthopedic Treatment In Flower Mound, TX

by Administrator 23. May 2016 10:41

Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome, also referred to as Runner’s Knee, is a medical condition seen in athletes who indulge in sports that involve excessive bending and flexing of the knee joint. It causes pain in the knee cap or patella due to several reasons. The condition is caused due to stress on the patella (kneecap) where it slides through a shallow groove in the femur (thighbone).

Causes

  • Direct fall or hit on the knee
  • Inherent problems in alignment of the knee bones
  • Muscular instability or weakness (legs and thighs)
  • Overuse of the joint by athletes who practice excessive lunging, bending and flexing of the knee
  • Defects in the foot anatomy such as overpronation, fallen arches or hypermobile feet can result in injuries to the kneecap. Such defects do not allow even distribution of stress and weight on the knee joint
  • Sudden increase in the intensity of exercise
  • Being overweight
  • Thickening or inflammation of the joint lining
  • Arthritis
  • Kneecap Dislocation
  • Inadequate warm up before an activity
  • Wearing shoes that do not provide adequate support
  • Improper posture while running or exercising

Symptoms

  • Pain in the kneecap
  • Popping or grinding sensation when the knee is moved
  • Pain may get aggravated with squatting, running, kneeling or running
  • Difficulty in walking uphill or climbing stairs
  • Tenderness and swelling around the knee cap
  • Discomfort may increase after physical activity

Diagnosis

  • Physical examination of the joint by the doctor
  • X-ray imaging to check for bone damage
  • MRI and CT scans may help to diagnose soft tissue damages
  • Blood tests may be suggested
  • Evaluation of the patient’s medical history

Treatment

  • Rest the injured knee as much as possible
  • Weight bearing should be avoided
  • Ice packs may be applied at regular intervals for 2-3 days to curb swelling
  • Patellar straps and elastic bandage may be used to compress the knee
  • Keep the knee elevated while resting
  • Prescription of pain killers and anti-inflammatory medicines
  • Exercises that strengthen the quadriceps muscles should be performed
  • Orthotic supports such as customized foot arches may be used in case of Flat Feet
  • Surgical correction of misaligned knee cap
  • Surgical removal of damaged cartilage or tissues
  • Use of knee brace post treatment to provide support to the joint

For diagnosis and treatment of Runner’s Knee, consult the orthopedic surgeons at OrthoTexas. Patients in Flower Mound, TX can call at (972) 899 – 4679 to schedule an appointment.

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Communication, Positivity, Preventative Maintenance

by Administrator 25. March 2016 06:50

Upgrade Your Physical Therapy Experience

By Stacy Apple

Physical therapy is a crucial step in the treatment and recovery of a variety of diseases and medical procedures.  It has roots going as far back as 460 BC, when it’s believed physicians like Hippocrates advocated massage and hydrotherapy treatments for their patients.  In the eighteenth century, a breakthrough was introduced to the Orthopedic community when the Gymnasticon, similar to a stationary bicycle, was developed and paved the way for modern physical therapy treatments.

It has grown leaps and bounds since the days of Hippocrates and the Gymnasticon, but the foundation of physical therapy remains unwavering.  Physical therapists seek to treat pain, disease, or injury by physical means, without drugs or surgery.  “Every diagnosis is unique, but there are many patients who successfully avoid surgery by strengthening muscles, increasing flexibility, and improving joint health with exercise,” says Cindy Murray, Director of Rehabilitation at OrthoTexas’ Plano, Frisco and Dr. Pepper Starscenter locations. Many physical therapists even offer preventative screenings to identify high-risk individuals in specific sports and general fitness populations. Once areas of concern are identified, they can provide exercise recommendations to decrease the risk of injury.

Although preventative maintenance works well, sometimes an injury can’t be avoided. When an injury requires surgery, many patients can improve their recovery time with pre-operative therapy. “Physical therapists deal with movement dysfunction, so we’re addressing inflamed and injured areas, which are usually quite painful,” explains Michael Cox, Director of Rehabilitation at Ortho Texas’ Carrolton location. “Many patients haven't been moving the injured body part because of the pain, or per instruction from their doctor. This lack of movement causes increased stiffness, and pain with movement.” Pre-operative therapy can help enhance your body’s recovery process by improving the health of the affected area, before the stress of surgery is incurred. Once a patient enters therapy, whether its preventative, or post operation, they should look to their physical therapist for a plan. “Since we can’t cure the human body overnight,” Murray clarifies, “it’s our job to help patients understand the recovery process, so they have clear expectations.”

When patients undergo surgery, they place their trust and expectations in the hands of their surgeon.  At OrthoTexas, the doctor-patient relationship doesn’t end when physical therapy begins. The patient journey at OrthoTexas is a unique one, because by housing the physical therapy clinics, doctors and therapists are able to work hand-in-hand to give their patients a cohesive recovery plan.  Murray and Cox specialize in Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, and have spent over 30 cumulative years rehabilitating patients at OrthoTexas’ owned and operated physical therapy clinics. “Communication is a necessity to an effective rehabilitation experience,” Cox explains. “For example, if a problem or question arises during therapy, we can seamlessly contact the patient's physician for a consultation; ensuring there is no time lost in the recovery process,” adds Murray.

Whether you choose to begin your journey to recovery with a seasoned OrthoTexas physical therapist, or you choose another clinic, its important to keep a few things in mind. “The patient needs to remember they play a major role in their recovery,” reminds Murray. Staying motivated to reach your goals and improve your condition is key. Compliance with activity modification and home exercise programs will ensure you are successful with your therapy. “Above all,” says Cox, “stay positive.” People who are positive tend to recover much more quickly than those who focus solely on their pain.

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