Radiculopathy: Orthopedic Treatment In McKinney

by Administrator 10. January 2017 13:26

Radiculopathy is a medical condition that occurs when a nerve in the spine gets pinched or irritated. There are several nerves or ‘nerve roots’ that emerge from the intervertebral joints and spread out into different parts of the body, thus controlling their movement as well as sensation. Radiculopathy may affect the cervical, thoracic or lower spine. However, it is most commonly observed in the lumbar portion. The cervical spine controls the neck and the arms, the abdomen and chest are controlled by the thoracic spine while the legs, hips and the feet are affected by the lumbar spine. The location of the pinched nerve determines which part of the body will have the symptoms.

Causes

  • Activities that lead to overuse or excessive stressing of the spine
  • Injury during contact sports
  • Genetic traits may predispose family members to develop Radiculopathy
  • Doing excessive labor work or lifting heavy weights
  • Disc Herniation may pressurize the nerve as it emerges out of the joint spaces within the spine
  • Osteophytes or bone spurs may put pressure on the spinal nerves
  • Thickening of the ligaments supporting the spine
  • Osteoarthritis of the spine
  • Bone tumor
  • Spinal infection
  • Abnormal curvature of the spine developed due to Scoliosis
  • External trauma

Symptoms

  • Pain which is generally localized depending on the nerve that is pinched. It may occur in the lower back or the neck and may radiate down into the arms, legs, thighs and buttocks
  • Numbness or tingling sensation in the legs and arms
  • The affected part of the spine may feel tender when touched
  • The muscles controlled by the nerve tend to get weak and may also result in Paralysis

Diagnosis

  • The medical and family history of the patient may be taken into consideration
  • A detailed physical examination and analysis of the symptoms reported. The orthopedic doctor may test the range of motion, muscle strength and abnormalities in reflexes, if any
  • X-ray imaging may be done to identify tumors, changes in spine structure, osteophytes etc.
  • MRI or CT scan may be conducted to analyze the location of the affected nerve and condition of soft tissue structures, discs or ligaments
  • An EMG test may be recommended to identify nerve damage

Treatment

  • The patient may be advised to take rest and avoid any activity that causes stress to the back or neck
  • A physical therapy program may be initiated to educate the patient about good postural habits, techniques to perform physical tasks without stressing the spine and exercises to strengthen the supporting structures
  • Lumbar traction may be recommended in some cases to alleviate the nerve compression and create more intervertebral space
  • Injecting steroids directly into the affected part of the spine may help to relieve pain
  • Anti-inflammatory medicines may be prescribed by the doctor
  • Laminectomy- Surgical removal of the bone that compresses the nerve
  • Discectomy- Surgical removal of the Herniated Disc that may be pressing upon the nerve root

For treatment of Radiculopathy and other spine conditions, visit OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment with the orthopedic surgeons in McKinney, TX, you can call at (972) 727 – 9995.

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Distal Biceps Tendon Rupture: Orthopedic McKinney

by Administrator 13. June 2016 11:41

Biceps, also termed as the biceps brachii, refers to the thick muscle that lies in front part of the upper arm. It is connected both to the shoulder and the elbow by two different tendons that help attach muscles to the bones. The tendons are made up of collagen which gives them flexibility and a high tensile strength. The tendon that attaches the biceps muscle to the elbow is called the Distal Biceps Tendon. It connects the biceps to the radius bone which forms a part of the forearm. Tearing of this tendon and its detachment from the bone is referred to as Distal Biceps Tendon Rupture. In some cases the ruptured tendon may retract and pull towards the shoulder. The condition is mostly observed in men over 35 years of age and sportspersons such as weight lifters as well as body builders.

Causes

  • Catching a heavy object falling from a height
  • Tendonitis or weakening of tendons over a period of time may make them susceptible to ruptures
  • Lifting heavy weights with the elbow bent

Symptoms

  • Pain near the elbow
  • A popping sound at the time of injury
  • In case of a complete rupture, a hollow may be created near the elbow as the tendon retracts
  • A lump may be formed in the upper arm
  • Weakness may be felt in the arm
  • Limited range of motion
  • Difficulty in rotating the arm
  • Swelling
  • Bruising or discoloration
  • Muscle spasms in the arm
  • A feeling of warmth may spread in the elbow joint

Diagnosis

  • Clinical observation of the injured arm
  • MRI scan
  • X-ray imaging to check for bone damage or displacement
  • Evaluation of the patient’s medical history

Treatment
Distal Biceps Tendon Rupture can be treated both surgically and non-surgically.

Non-surgical or conservative methods may include:

  • Use of a sling to support the elbow
  • Prescription of anti-inflammatory medicines
  • Physical therapy to strengthen the supporting muscles
  • Resting the elbow and avoiding any stressful activity
  • Applying ice packs

Surgical methods of treatment include:

  • Direct Repair- The loose end of the tendon may be repaired and attached back to the elbow joint by making two incisions in the arm (at the front and back) above the elbow
  • Suture Anchor Method which involves attaching the torn tendon to the radius bone by inserting a suture anchor
  • Surgical reconstruction of the damaged tendon may be done by extracting a part of another tendon within the body

The shoulder specialists at OrthoTexas provide complete diagnosis and treatment for Distal Biceps Tendon Rupture. To schedule an appointment with the shoulder surgeons in McKinney, TX, you can call at (972) 727 – 9995 or visit 7300 Eldorado Parkway, Suites 165/165A, McKinney, TX 75070.

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Whiplash: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 15. February 2016 07:21

Whiplash refers to a neck injury caused due a sudden and jerky forward, backward or sideways movement of the head. The excessive force leads to stretching or tearing of the ligaments and tendons in the neck. Although the condition is not usually severe, it can cause long-lasting pain and discomfort to the patient. If the symptoms last for more than six months, it is referred to as Chronic Whiplash or Late Whiplash Syndrome.

Causes

  • Rear-end road accidents
  • Physical assault, such as being punched
  • Shaken Baby Syndrome
  • Horse riding
  • Sports related injuries
  • Direct blow to the head

Symptoms

  • Pain in the neck
  • Stiffness and decreased range of motion
  • Muscle tension
  • Swelling
  • Inability to move the neck
  • Tenderness
  • Headache that may radiate from the base of the skull to the forehead
  • Dizziness
  • Numbness or tingling sensation in the arms
  • Vision problems
  • Constant tiredness
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Ringing in the ears

Diagnosis

The orthopedic doctor may conduct a physical examination to diagnose Whiplash. The patient may be asked to move his neck, head and arms so as to determine range of motion as well as stiffness. Imaging tests such as X-ray, CT scan or MRI may be conducted to rule out other medical conditions that may cause neck pain, such as a fracture or muscle strain.

Treatment

  • Medications: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications may be prescribed to relieve pain.
  • Muscle Relaxants: These may help to eliminate pain, reduce muscle spasms and help restore normal sleep.
  • Rest: The orthopedic doctor may advise the patient to take rest and keep the neck immobile for the first few hours following the injury.
  • Neck Brace: Wearing a collar or neck brace may help to provide support to the neck. However, these should only be worn as prescribed by the doctor. Long term use of brace may weaken the muscles of the neck and delay recovery.
  • Ice Or Heat: Applying ice or heat packs to the affected area may help to reduce swelling and pain.
  • Physical Therapy: The orthopedic doctor may prescribe certain stretching exercises to restore the range of motion in the neck. Maintaining a good posture and learning relaxation techniques may help to strengthen muscles as well as prevent future injuries.

For comprehensive treatment of Whiplash and other back problems, visit OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment with the orthopedic doctors in McKinney, TX, you can call at (972) 727 – 9995 or visit McKinney Medical Village, 7300 Eldorado Parkway, Suites 165/165A, McKinney, TX 75070.

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Orthopedic Treatment For Kneecap Dislocation

by Administrator 13. October 2014 10:21

Kneecap or Patellar dislocation is a common injury occurring to athletes and is caused due to a sudden change in direction or a twist in the leg. Kneecap is the triangle or round shaped bone in the anterior part of the knee that slides over a joint whenever you try to straighten or bend your knee.  A dislocation involves the dislocation or coming out of the bone from the groove which results in overstretching or tearing of the supporting tissues.

Causes

Kneecap dislocation can occur in both contact and non-contact situations. The major cause of this condition in athletes is a sudden change in movement while the leg is held firm on the ground. It puts strain on the knee and the bone is likely to move out of its normal place. It can also occur as a result of a direct blow to the knee or a high impact injury such as a fall or a motor vehicle accident.

Symptoms

  • Visible deformity in the knee
  • Difficulty in straightening the knee
  • Pain and tenderness in and around the knee
  • Acute swelling
  • Hyper-mobile kneecap
  • Discoloration at the site of the injury
  • Instability or giving away of the knee, sometimes leading to a fall

Treatment

Physical Therapy

Majority of patients with kneecap dislocation require a few sessions of physical therapy to bring the patella back into its place and prevent recurrent dislocations. Some of the benefits of undergoing physical therapy are:

  • Reducing inflammation and pain
  • Providing support to the patella by using braces or taping
  • Normalizing the range of motion for the joint
  • Strengthening the knee muscles
  • Strengthening the lower limbs, i.e. hip, pelvis and calf muscles
  • Improving your balance and agility
  • Improving kneecap alignment
  • Improving your technique of moving the knee while running, walking, hopping, landing and squatting.
  • Reducing the chances of recurrent dislocations

Surgery

If the symptoms do not improve with physical therapy or if the patent experiences recurrent dislocations, the orthopedic surgeon might suggest him to undergo surgical treatment to provide stability to the kneecap. If there are repeated dislocations, the kneecap and muscles might need to be realigned during surgery.

For any consultation regarding kneecap dislocation, visit the knee doctors at OrthoTexas, McKinney, TX. To schedule an appointment, you can call at (972) 727-9995 or visit the clinic at McKinney Medical Village, 7300 Eldorado Parkway Suites 165/165A, McKinney, Texas 75070.

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