Scheuermann's Kyphosis: Orthopedic Plano

by Administrator 14. March 2017 11:08

Scheuermann’s Kyphosis, also known as Juvenile Kyphosis or Calve’s disease, is a self-limiting disorder that creates an abnormal curvature of the spine. This is a thoracolumbar disorder that commonly affects the adolescents during their growth phase. A normal spine is vertically inclined and its cylindrical shaped vertebrae are placed one above the other to keep it stable. A slight curve is present in the spine which allows it to bear the impact of the body’s movements and to absorb external shocks effectively. In some cases, the vertebrae may grow at a different rate relative to each other and they tend to get stacked one above the other. This abnormal growth spurt increases the spinal curvature and if it exceeds 45 degrees, the condition is considered as abnormal.

Scheuermann’s Kyphosis may affect the upper back (thoracic spine) or the lower back (lumbar spine).The condition has both physical and psychological bearing on the patient and can lead to permanent disfigurement. It can also damage the internal organs in severe cases.

Causes

  • Inherent genetic structure
  • Direct or indirect injury caused to the spine
  • Inherent weakness in the skeletal structure
  • Thickening of ligaments which connect the two vertebrae may cause abnormal curvature
  • Loss or lack of blood supply to the inter-vertebral cartilage
  • Excessive bending for long hours or maintaining a poor posture for long

Symptoms

  • Pain may radiate from a specific point in the spine to the neck
  • Loss of vertebral height in teenagers
  • Pain and discomfort may get aggravated during and after activity
  • Muscle fatigue, cramps and stiffness in the back and extremities
  • Visible deformity in the form of a hunchback
  • Limited range of motion
  • The space available for the lung cavity may be compromised with the excessive curving of the spine. This may cause breathing problem.
  • Redness in the lower or upper spine region
  • Instability of the spine
  • Difficulty in sitting, lying down or standing for long
  • Tightness in the hamstring muscles

Diagnosis

  • A detailed clinical evaluation of the patient, medical history, family traits and existing symptoms
  • X-ray imaging to study the structure of the bones and changes in them, if any
  • Testing of the other parameters such as range of motion, flexibility of spine and muscle strength
  • MRI or CT scan may additionally be required

Treatment

Scheuermann’s Kyphosis can be treated surgically and non-surgically depending on the severity or progression of the disorder. The doctor may recommend a surgery if:

  • The spinal curvature exceeds 75 degrees
  • The condition is progressive and likely to deteriorate the condition further or
  • The conservative methods have not brought any relief.

Non-surgical methods

  • Prescription of anti-inflammatory medicines to ease the discomfort
  • Wearing a removable back brace may be recommended to help reverse the curvature and combat pain
  • Heating pads may be used to alleviate pain and curb inflammation. It also relaxes the surrounding soft tissues that support the spine
  • Physical therapy may helpsto improve flexibility, range of motion and strength of the spine
  • Supporting the back with additional pillows while sleeping
  • Weight bearing should be strictly avoided

Surgical methods

  • Thoracotomy- It is a type of bone graft technique in which an incision is made in the chest to remove inter-vertebral discs, tissues and place a donor bone. It then fuses with the spine. The bone may be extracted from other joints of the body such as the hip
  • Spine Fusion Instrumentation- The incision is made at the back of the spine and screws, pins, rods are inserted to correct the curvature and prevent it from becoming a permanent deformity
  • Lifting of weights and excessive bending should be avoided post-surgery for 8-12 months. This allows the bones to solidify.

To know more about Scheuermann's Kyphosis, consult the doctors at OrthoTexas. You can visit them at 4031 West Plano Parkway Suite 100, Plano, TX 75093. For an appointment, call at (972) 985 – 1072

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Orthopedic Treatment For Twisted Neck

by Administrator 13. February 2017 07:45

Twisting of the neck to one side is medically referred to as Torticollis or wry neck. It is a common condition that occurs when the muscles that hold the neck and aid in its movement are affected. The symptoms may ease out naturally over a few days while it may require longer duration and medical treatment in severe cases.  Twisted Neck is a commonly reported cause of pain in young people, although it may affect anybody irrespective of age or gender. The person may not necessarily have a past history of neck injury or pain.

Causes

  • Acute Torticollis – It occurs when a ligament or muscle in the neck or shoulder is irritated or sprained
  • Carrying heavy bags or load on the shoulder or in one hand
  • Working long on the computer without maintaining a correct posture or eye view
  • Exposure of the neck muscles to the cold
  • Ear infection
  • Not having adequate support under the head and neck while sleeping
  • Cervical Dystonia- muscle spasms in the neck that occur in people above the age of 40 years. It leads to abnormal head and neck movements including Torticollis
  • Sometimes upper throat infections can affect the lymph nodes that may lead to stiff neck and muscle spasms
  • Cervical or head injury
  • Damage to the blood vessels that flow through the neck
  • Could be a side effect of some medications
  • Congenital Defects- the head of the fetus may be wrongly positioned in the womb causing wry neck

Symptoms

  • Pain on one side of the neck
  • Stiffness in the neck
  • Difficulty in turning the neck to the other side
  • Inability to keep the neck straight
  • The muscles on the affected side feel tender or swollen when touched
  • The pain may radiate into the shoulders and upper back
  • Tingling sensation in the neck
  • The head and the chin may tilt in opposite directions
  • Muscle spasms

Diagnosis

  • Analysis of the symptoms and detailed examination of the neck
  • X-ray and other tests may be suggested in case the doctor suspects a serious underlying cause for the existing condition
  • EMG (electromyogram) test may be conducted to locate the affected muscles

Treatment

The symptoms of a twisted neck tend to improve naturally within 24-48 hours. In case they persist longer, the following treatment options may be employed.

  • Some gentle neck exercises may promote movement and flexibility. These may reduce the stiffness
  • Anti-inflammatory medicines and muscle relaxants may be prescribed
  • If the pain is severe in the initial phase, resting the neck for a day or two may be required.
  • Driving should be avoided
  • Some patients may find relief by use of heat pads
  • Gentle traction may be applied
  • Maintain a good posture at work and while standing, sitting or walking
  • Use a firm pillow while sleeping
  • In case of Cervical Dystonia, some medicines may be injected into the neck to paralyze the muscles and stop pain/ spasms
  • Surgery may be recommended if the condition becomes chronic. The procedure aims at lengthening muscles, cutting nerves (to interrupt signals) and fusing some vertebrae in the neck.

The spine specialists at OrthoTexas offer comprehensive treatment for twisted neck and other conditions of the cervical spine. For appointment with orthopedic doctors in Plano, TX, call at (972) 985-1072.

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Osteochondritis Dissecans Of The Elbow

by Administrator 30. December 2016 07:34

The elbow joint consists of various bones and tissues that are nourished by the blood supply from numerous arteries. Insufficient or loss of blood supply to these parts may lead to death of the bone and the articular cartilage that protects it. This condition is termed as the Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Elbow. The lower part of the humerus, Capitellum, is most commonly affected by the condition. It helps to rotate the palm and forearm.

In most cases, Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Elbow is observed in people aged 10-20 years who are particularly active in sports. The damage to the bone or the cartilage may be partial or complete. If it is partially affected, the problem may heal through conservative methods of treatment. However, in severe cases, the bone piece or cartilage tissue may get detached and begin floating within the joint spaces.

Causes

  • People with a family history of Osteochondritis Dissecans are more likely to develop this condition
  • Repeated injuries to the joint may eventually result in loss of blood supply (Avascular Necrosis)
  • Indulging in sports that require excessive overhead movement, such as basketball, tennis, volleyball, gymnastics etc., may stress the elbow joint
  • Occupations or activities that require lifting heavy weights

Symptoms

  • Pain while bending or straightening the elbow
  • Crepitus- a sensation or sound of bone cracking when the elbow is moved
  • Swelling and tenderness
  • Limited range of motion
  • A feeling of the joint being unstable

Diagnosis

  • Detailed clinical evaluation of the joint using palpation, visual analysis and moving the affected arm in different directions
  • Family and medical history of the patient may be taken into consideration
  • MRI or CT scans may be carried out to assess the exact location and severity of damage to the cartilage
  • X-ray imaging may be done to examine the changes in bone structure

Treatment

  • Immobilization of the joint using a brace, splint, sling or cast
  • The patient may be required to abstain from any activity that causes puts stress on the elbow. This is usually recommended in cases where the bone or cartilage is partially damaged. The patient, being in the growth phase, tends to develop new bone mass and cartilage tissue that repairs the damaged one
  • Physical therapy may be recommended to maintain joint health and flexibility
  • Corticosteroid injections may be administered directly into the joint for immediate relief
  • Surgical removal of the damaged bone mass or cartilage
  • Arthroscopic surgery to drill holes into the bone to increase blood supply to the affected area and promote cartilage growth
  • Loose parts of the bone may be held in place using screws and pins
  • Bone and cartilage graft- A piece of healthy bone or cartilage tissue may be extracted from another part of the body and planted in place of the damaged ones to  regain functionality of the joint

For diagnosis and treatment of Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Elbow, visit OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment with the elbow doctors in Plano, TX, you can call at (972) 985 – 1072.

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Golfer’s Elbow: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 19. August 2016 06:26

Golfer’s Elbow or Medial Epicondylitis is a medical condition that affects the muscles in the forearm that enable us to hold, twist the arm or grip onto things. It causes pain in the bony outgrowth or bump on the inner side of the elbow joint. Golfer’s Elbow can be categorically defined as a type of Elbow Tendinitis that occurs due to excessive use of the arm. People who are obese, more than 40 years of age or indulge in smoking are at a greater risk of developing the condition.

Causes

  • Repetitive arm movements while painting, raking, hammering etc.
  • Sports injury, particularly while playing tennis, golf, hammer throw etc.
  • Inadequate warming up before playing a sport
  • Repeated stress or overuse of the forearm muscles
  • Working on the computer for long hours

Symptoms

  • Pain in the inner side of the elbow
  • Discomfort may worsen while moving the forearm
  • Tenderness
  • Stiffness when the arm is flexed or while making a fist
  • Weakness in hands
  • Numbness and tingling sensation in the hand or fingers
  • Daily activities such as turning a knob, shaking hands, squeezing  or lifting weights may become difficult
  • Warmth and tenderness around the elbow

Diagnosis

  • Detailed analysis of the patient’s previous medical conditions and elbow surgeries, symptoms, daily activities etc.
  • The orthopedic doctor may ask the patient to move the arm, wrist and hands in different directions to assess the range of motion 
  • Palpation to check for tenderness or stiffness
  • X-ray may be done to rule out fracture and other problems associated with the bone structure
  • An MRI scan may be conducted to analyze damage to soft tissues

Treatment

  • Rest the affected arm and avoid any activity that may aggravate pain
  • Take a prescribed course of anti-inflammatory medicines
  • Cryotherapy- apply ice packs at regular intervals for few days
  • Use a removable elbow brace to prevent tendon strain
  • The doctor may recommend certain exercises to stretch and lengthen the tendon of the wrist extensor muscle
  • Adjustments can be made in the movement of the arm while playing a sport
  • A soft elastic band or splint may be used to reduce pressure on the tendon
  • Surgery may be required if the pain does not subside within 6-12 months of treatment. The procedure may involve using ultrasound guided imagery to remove the scar tissue near the tendon

We, at OrthoTexas, provide complete diagnosis and treatment for Golfer’s Elbow. To schedule an appointment with our sports doctors in Plano, TX, you can call at (972) 985 – 1072 or visit 4031 West Plano Parkway, Suite 100, Plano, TX 75093.

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Discoid Meniscus: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 3. August 2016 08:35

Meniscus is a wedge shaped piece of cartilage present between the knee bones. It enables the knee to bend or straighten, provides a cushioning effect within the joint and protects the articular cartilage that lines the bones. There are two menisci in each knee - medial meniscus (on the inner side of the knee) and lateral meniscus (lies on outer side of the joint). These are attached to the bones by the meniscofemoral ligament.

Discoid Meniscus is a rare orthopedic condition that occurs when the meniscus attains a half moon or oval shape and thickens up. In most cases, the patients may not experience any symptoms throughout his life. However, in some instances, it may hinder the patient’s day to day life and needs immediate treatment. Depending on the severity of the condition, Discoid Meniscus may be classified as:

  • Incomplete- It involves slight thickening and change in shape of the meniscus
  • Complete- The meniscus becomes wide and thick enough to cover the shin bone
  • Hypermobile Wrisberg- The meniscofemoral ligament is absent which causes the meniscus to dislocate and slip into the joint

Causes

  • It is mainly inherited or occurs due to a congenital birth defect
  • Activities that require excessive running, jumping or rapid change of direction may injure the meniscus

Symptoms

  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Limited range of motion
  • Stiffness
  • Instability, locking and popping sensation in the joint
  • Weakness
  • Difficulty in straightening the knee
  • Feeling that the knee may give away

Diagnosis

  • Analysis of patient’s medical and family history
  • Detailed clinical examination of the knee and the symptoms reported
  • The orthopedic doctor may manually flex the knee in different directions to check for popping sound
  • X-ray imaging to check for misalignments in bone structure
  • MRI test to examine the changes in soft tissue structures including meniscus

Treatment

  • Surgical reshaping of the meniscus, which is medically termed as Saucerization
  • The procedure may be followed by an arthroscopic surgery to remove the torn part of the meniscus or perform other soft tissue repairs
  • In case of a minor tear, the meniscus may be stitched back to the bone
  • Use of crutches or cane may be recommended to avoid putting pressure on the knee post-surgery
  • Physiotherapy may help to restore flexibility, strength and mobility to the joint during the recovery period

The knee surgeons at OrthoTexas specialize in the treatment of Discoid Meniscus and other orthopedic conditions. Patients in Plano, TX can call at (972) 985 – 1072 to schedule an appointment.

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Nursemaid’s Elbow: Orthopedic Treatment In Plano

by Administrator 12. July 2016 13:04

Nursemaid’s Elbow or Radial Head Subluxation is a common physical disorder affecting children in the age group of 1-7 years. The injury is also known as Pulled Elbow and Toddler’s Elbow. As the bones and joints of children are tender and still in a formative stage, there is an increased likelihood of dislocations. The elbow joint is made up of the upper arm bone, humerus, and two lower arm bones; ulna and radius. These are held together by the ligaments, muscles and tendons. The elbow further comprises into two joints:

  • Humeroulnar joint, where the humerus meets the ulna and enables the elbow to bend
  • Radiocapitellar joint, the meeting point of radius and humerus that enables the forearm to rotate

In Nursemaid’s Elbow, the radiocapitellar joint gets dislocated. It is a temporary injury and may not lead to any long term damage to the joint. As the child grows, the ligaments and muscles become stronger as well as keep the joint stable, thereby, reducing the chances of suffering the injury.

Causes

  • A sudden force to the child’s wrist or arm
  • Yanking or swinging the child with the arm
  • Lifting the child by holding his hands or arms
  • Forcefully dragging a child by pulling his/her arm
  • Loose ligaments
  • Breaking a fall with an outstretched arm
  • Rolling over in bed may lead to partial displacement of the bones

Symptoms

  • Visible deformity in the form of a slightly bent arm
  • Pain which may increase while moving the arm
  • Inability to rotate the arm or palm
  • The child may tend to hold his arm near the body and does not move it

Diagnosis

  • Clinical evaluation of the injured arm and the mode of injury
  • The doctor may observe the way the child holds, moves or bends the arm
  • X-ray imaging may be done to rule out fracture or damage to adjacent structures 

Treatment

  • Physical Reduction- The orthopedic doctor may manually push the bone back in place. This procedure may cause some initial discomfort to the child but once the position of the bone is restored, he may be able to move the arm easily.
  • Anti-inflammatory medicines may be prescribed to provide relief from pain and inflammation.
  • Wearing a sling for a few days may be recommended to keep the arm in a stable position

We, at OrthoTexas, provide complete diagnosis and treatment for Nursemaid’s Elbow. To schedule an appointment with our elbow doctors in Plano, TX, you can call at (972) 985 – 1072 or visit 4031 West Plano Parkway Suite 100, Plano, TX 75093.

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Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injury: Orthopedic Plano

by Administrator 29. June 2016 06:05

The Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) is a tough band of fibrous tissue located inside the knee. It joins the thigh bone or femur to the top of the lower leg bone or the tibia. The main function of MCL is to prevent the knee from bending inward. An MCL injury refers to a sprain in the medial collateral ligament. It mostly occurs in sports activities that involve a lot of jumping.

Causes

  • Sudden bending or twisting of the knee
  • A quick change in direction
  • Trauma to the exterior of the knee during sports such as football or soccer
  • Skiing accidents

Symptoms

  • Pain and inflammation
  • Inability to move the knee
  • Stiffness
  • A popping sound at the time of injury
  • The knee may give out when the patient tries to stand upright
  • Instability

Diagnosis

  • Physical examination of the knee may be done
  • The doctor may ask the patient to bend the knee and move it in different directions to check for range of motion
  • The stability of the ligaments may also be tested
  • Imaging tests such as an X-Ray may be conducted by the doctor to clearly see the bone structures in the knee
  • Further imaging tests such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) may be required to get a clear picture of the knee muscles and ligaments

Treatment
Non-surgical treatment

  • Application of ice packs may help to reduce swelling
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may also help in reducing the pain and discomfort
  • The doctor may advise using an elastic bandage or brace to compress the knee
  • Elevating the knee above the heart level may provide respite from swelling
  • Physical therapy may be recommended to improve the range of motion and strengthen the knee ligaments
  • Complete rest is crucial for quick recovery

Surgical treatment

  • Surgery may be required if the ligament does not heal with conservative treatment.
  • Arthroscopy may be performed to look for other associated injuries in the knee
  • The surgeons may use bone staples or metal screws to re-attach the torn ligaments

The knee surgeons at OrthoTexas provide treatment for Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injury and other knee problems. To schedule an appointment, call at (972) 985-1072 or visit 4031 West Plano Parkway Suite 100, Plano, TX 75093.

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Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome: Orthopedics Plano

by Administrator 27. April 2016 11:57

Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome is a painful condition characterized by the buildup of intense pressure inside a muscle compartment, causing it to gradually wear out. It usually affects the muscles in the hips, highs and lower legs. Repetitively performing certain activities such as walking, running, swimming, jumping, intense workouts etc. increases the risk of developing Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome. The condition is most commonly seen in athletes under the age of 30 years.

Causes

  • Poor body control during movement
  • Excessive exercising or physical activity
  • Wearing ill-fitted footwear
  • Running on hard or uneven surfaces
  • Working out too frequently

Symptoms

  • Shooting pain in the leg
  • Swelling
  • Visibly bulging muscles
  • Tightness
  • Limited range of motion
  • Numbness or tingling sensation
  • Weakness
  • Foot Drop, in severe cases
  • Pain may increase with physical activity and subside with rest
  • Difficulty stretching the leg

Diagnosis

The orthopedic doctor may conduct a physical examination to evaluate the symptoms experienced by the patient. Imaging tests, such as X-ray or MRI scan, may be conducted to rule out other possible medical conditions, such as stress fracture, Shin Splints, Tendinitis etc. Another test, called the Compartment Pressure Testing, may also be recommended to measure the pressure inside the muscle compartment before, during and after exercise. It may also help to assess the severity of damage caused to the tissues.

Treatment

  • Medications: The doctor may prescribe anti-inflammatory medications to reduce pain and inflammation in the leg.
  • Activity Modification: Avoiding exercises or switching to low impact workouts may help to ease the symptoms. Using different biomechanical techniques, such as exercising on an even and smooth surface or changing the way of landing from a jump, may also help in relieving pain.
  • RICE Therapy: This includes taking rest, applying ice after physical activity and keeping the leg elevated may help to compress swelling.
  • Physical Therapy: The patient may be advised to undergo physical therapy to strengthen the muscles and improve the range of motion of the leg.
  • Orthotics: Using custom orthotic shoe inserts or heel pads may help to release stress from the affected leg during physical activity.
  • Surgery: If conservative treatment is not effective, surgery may be required to relieve pressure from the muscle compartment. During the procedure, the surgeon may remove or make incisions in the fascia to allow the muscles to expand freely.

OrthoTexas provides effective treatment for Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome and other medical conditions. To schedule an appointment with the orthopedic surgeons in Plano, TX, you can call at (972) 985 – 1072 or visit 4031 West Plano Parkway Suite 100, Plano, TX 75093.

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Shoulder Instability: Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

by Administrator 19. April 2016 09:12

Shoulder Instability occurs when the ligaments, tendons and connective tissues wear out as well as are unable to hold the joint bones together. The shoulder is the most mobile joint of the body that allows you to lift and rotate the arm. However, during certain movements, excessive stress may be put on the joint capsule, causing the ligaments to tear. As a result, the shoulder joint may become loose and the bones may slide excessively over each other. This condition is known as Shoulder Instability. It may either cause the humerus to move partially (subluxation) or completely (dislocation) out of the glenoid cavity. 

Causes 

  • Repetitive overhead movements 
  • Previous shoulder injury 
  • Genetically loose ligaments 
  • Joint overuse

Symptoms

  • Pain
  • Inflammation
  • Feeling that the shoulder may give out
  • Tenderness to touch 
  • The joint may feel loose
  • Recurrent shoulder dislocations 
  • Stiffness 
  • Pain may increase with overhead movements 
  • Limited range of motion
  • Numbness and tingling in the arm
  • Popping or clicking sensation during certain arm movements 
  • Difficulty sleeping on the affected shoulder 

Diagnosis 

The shoulder specialist may conduct a physical examination and inquire about any previous injury or joint dislocation. He may move the shoulder in different directions to check for strength and range of motion. Imaging tests, such as X-ray, CT scan or MRI may be required to determine the extent of damage caused to the ligaments and connective tissues within the shoulder joint.  

Treatment 

  • Lifestyle Modification: The patient may be advised to give rest to the affected shoulder and avoid activities that may aggravate the symptoms.
  • Medication: The doctor may prescribe non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications to provide relief from pain and swelling. 
  • Ice Packs: Applying ice packs at frequent intervals may also help to eliminate inflammation and reduce pain. 
  • Shoulder Brace: The doctor may advise wearing a shoulder brace or sling to provide support and hold the joint in a properly aligned position. This will restrict any jerky movements and prevent further damage to the shoulder.  
  • Physical Therapy: The physical therapist may suggest certain stretching and strengthening exercises to improve the stability of the joint. 
  • Surgery: Surgical treatment may be required to repair torn or loose ligaments so that they can hold the joint firmly in place. 

The orthopedic surgeons at OrthoTexas provide comprehensive diagnosis and treatment for Shoulder Instability. To schedule an appointment in Plano, TX, you can call at (972) 985 – 1072 or visit 4031 West Plano Parkway Suite 100, Plano, TX 75093. 

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Hip Labral Tear: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 5. February 2016 09:57

The Hip Labral Tear affects the cartilage ring that surrounds the outer ring of the hip joint. This ring is called labrum and it acts as a gasket to hold the ball of the thigh bone within the hip joint socket. The labrum helps to stabilize the hip joint besides protecting the joint surface. A labrum tear can result from an injury or due to inherent structural abnormalities. Most of the patients recover within a few weeks of conservative treatment but in case of a complete labral tear, surgery may be required. A Hip Labral Tear can weaken the joint, put stress on the constituent bones and can lead to Osteoarthritis in the future.

Causes

  • Sports injury incurred by athletes who participate in ice hockey, golf, ballet and soccer
  • Abnormalities in the structure of the hip joint may cause the weakening of the joint
  • Dislocation in the hip joint can lead to wear and tear of the labrum
  • Activities that involve repetitive twisting and pivoting of the hip joint can stress the labrum causing a tear
  • The labrum can also get torn if the patient is suffering from Osteoarthritis of hip

Symptoms

  • The Hip Labral Tear generally does not have any apparent symptoms but one or more the following signs may occur:
  • Pain in the groin, pelvic or hip joint area
  • The hip joint may have restricted movement due to stiffness
  • A snapping, clicking or locking sensation in the hip joint
  • Radiating pain on the side or at the back of the hip

Diagnosis

  • The orthopedic doctor may conduct a detailed analysis of the activities that cause pain, dietary habits, medical history of the patient and his family, besides the details of the symptoms experienced.
  • Physical examination of the affected joint by moving the hip and legs in various directions to observe the patient’s gait
  • X-ray imaging to analyze extent of damage to the bone structure
  • MRI scan may be recommended to evaluate the condition of the soft tissues and ligaments

Treatment

  • Physical therapy may be recommended for stability and strengthening of the hip joint
  • Prescription of anti inflammatory pain killers for relief
  • Arthroscopic surgery may be performed in case of labral tear using fiber optic cameras and specific tools to repair the torn part

We, at OrthoTexas, provide effective treatment for Hip Labral Tear. For appointment with our orthopedic surgeons in Plano, TX, call at (972) 985 – 1072.

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