Fracture after Total Hip Replacement: Orthopedic Carrollton

by Administrator 31. January 2017 10:33

A break or crack in the artificial implant during or after the hip replacement process is termed as a periprosthetic fracture. It may occur in any part of the artificial implant although it is most commonly seen in the stem of the metallic component that is fixed within the femur. Treatment for this condition is surgical and it can be quite complicated as the  patients are generally old in age and the bone structure has already weakened.

Causes

  • A fall on the ground
  • Vehicular accidents that cause high intensity trauma to the joint
  • Direct blow to the leg or hip
  • People suffering from Osteoporosis are at a higher risk
  • Inherent muscular weakness may decrease the stability of the joint and predispose a person to such injuries
  • Osteolysis- The bones may begin to thin out with age and this may lead to the loosening of the femoral stem

Symptoms

  • Severe pain around the hip and thigh
  • Swelling
  • Bruising
  • Discrepancy in the limb length as the injured leg tends to shorten
  • Limited range of motion
  • Inability to bear body weight

Diagnosis

  • Detailed examination of the hip joint
  • Nerve testing to ensure the blood flow to the lower limbs is not affected
  • CT scan may be required to obtain a 3D image of the hip joint
  • Blood tests may be conducted to assess the general health condition of the patient
  • X-ray images of the pelvis, thigh and hip area may be required to analyze the severity of damage to the implant as well as surrounding bones

Treatment

  • Weight bearing should be restricted to avoid stressing the joint
  • Traction may be used in some cases to straighten the leg and keep the bones in place
  • Open Reduction- A surgical procedure that may be recommended if the implant is still secure within the femur. The broken bones are surgically placed back in their position and fastened using screws or pins (internal fixation)
  • Bone graft may be required in some cases as it helps in healing the fracture.
  • Surgical replacement of the damaged implant. This process is called Joint Revision
  • Blood thinning medications may be prescribed post surgery to prevent clotting in the leg or hip
  • Anti-inflammatory medications to relieve pain
  • Physical therapy may be recommended to promote joint movement during recovery phase
  • A hip brace may be worn for a few weeks to prevent stress on the joint

For treatment of periprosthetic fracture and other hip conditions, visit OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment with the hip specialists in Carrollton, TX, call at (972) 492-1334 or visit 4780 North Josey Lane, Carrollton, TX 75010.

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Cervical Fracture: Orthopedic Treatment In Carrollton

by Administrator 12. February 2016 05:53

Cervical fracture refers to the breakage of any one or more of the seven vertebrae in the upper back. These vertebrae connect the neck, head and back to the rest of the body as well as play a major role in maintaining balance. It is also referred to as the broken neck. Cervical fracture is a serious injury and may lead to paralysis, death as well as loss of movement or sensation in any part of the body.

Causes

  • An automobile accident
  • Sudden fall
  • Direct blow or trauma to the head or neck
  • Sports injury that involves a violent attack or combat
  • Twisting of the neck
  • Diving in a shallow pool

Symptoms

  • Immobility
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Pain that may spread from the neck to the upper body and arms
  • Deformity, bruising and swelling
  • Feeling of numbness in the arms, legs, body
  • Partial or complete paralysis
  • Visibility of lumps on the head or back
  • Breathing may be hampered in some cases
  • Muscle spasms
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Pins and needles sensation

Diagnosis

  • Neurological examination
  • CT scan, X-rays, MRI may be conducted to assess the location and severity of damage
  • Assessment of the functionality of the cervical spine by the orthopedic doctor
  • Evaluation of the details of injury, medical record and symptoms experienced by the patient

Treatment

  • Use of a cervical brace or collar for a few weeks may be prescribed in case the fracture is minor
  • Traction- use of heavy weights attached to a brace may be used to limits the movement of the spine. It may be prescribed for 8-12 weeks depending on the severity of the injury Surgical decompression to remove the broken fragments of tissues and bones from the spinal column
  • Surgical removal of the damaged intervertebral discs
  • Surgical fusion of a bone graft next to the broken vertebrae
  • Anti-inflammatory drugs may be administered to curb pain and inflammation
  • Physical therapy may be required to restore mobility and muscle strength in the cervical spine

For treatment of cervical fracture and other spine conditions, visit OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment with the orthopedic surgeons in Carrollton, TX, you can call at (972) 492 – 1334 or visit 4780 North Josey Lane, Carrollton, TX 75010.

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Hip Fracture: Orthopedic Carrollton

by Administrator 26. October 2015 06:49

The hip joint comprises of the femur (thigh bone) and the pelvic bone. Hip fracture occurs when there is a crack or break in the upper part of the femur. Also known as a proximal femoral fracture, the injury is more common among people above the age of 65 years. With increasing age, the bones start losing calcium and tend to become fragile, thereby, making the individual susceptible to a fracture.

Causes:

  • Sudden fall on a hard surface
  • Motorcycle or car accident
  • Injury caused by a sports activity
  • Osteoporosis
  • Deficiency of calcium and vitamin D
  • Genetic factors

Symptoms:

  • Severe pain in the hip and groin
  • Difficulty while moving and walking
  • Inability to put weight on the affected leg
  • Stiffness and inflammation around the hip
  • Bruising and discoloration
  • Leg tend to turn outwards to the injured side

Diagnosis:

The orthopedic doctor may conduct a physical examination to check for swelling, pain, tenderness in the injured hip. He may also conduct an X-ray to determine the exact location and severity of the fracture. A bone scan may be recommended in case of a hair line hip fracture.

Treatment:

Depending upon the age of the patient, medical history and the degree of displacement of hip joint, the orthopedic doctor may suggest the following treatment options:

  • Medication: Taking a course of anti-inflammatory medications, as prescribed by the orthopedic doctor, can help to reduce pain and inflammation.
  • Surgery: The following surgical procedures may be performed to treat a hip fracture:
  • Hip repair surgery: Also known as ‘hip pinning’, this procedure involves usage of metal screws, plates and rods to hold the bones together. The hip repair surgery is recommended when the bones can be aligned correctly.
  • Hip replacement surgery: In case of a major fracture, a hip replacement surgery may be required. In this procedure, the joint is partially or completely replaced by the doctor.
  • Physical therapy: Post-surgery, the patient may be advised to undergo physical therapy to restore movement in the hip joint. Performing light exercises, under the guidance of a physiotherapist can help to regain lost joint strength and flexibility.

For complete diagnosis and treatment of hip fracture, visit OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment with the orthopedic doctors in Carrollton, TX, you can call at (972) 492 – 1334 or visit 4780 North Josey Lane, Carrollton, TX 75010.

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Shoulder Dislocation Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 20. October 2015 18:07

The shoulder is a ball and socket joint that allows for upward, downward and rotational movement of the arm. The head of the humerus (arm bone) is the ball that fits into the socket (exterior part of the shoulder blade). Shoulder Dislocation occurs when the head of the humerus pops out of the socket. The condition is quite common due to the extensive range of motion of the shoulder joint. 

Causes:

  • Fall on a hard surface
  • Hard blow to the shoulder 
  • Motor vehicle accident
  • Contact sports such as football and hockey
  • Sports that involve falling from a height such as gymnastics and skiing
  • Sharp or unexpected twisting of the arm

Symptoms:

  • Extreme pain in the shoulder and upper arm 
  • Pain increases while trying to move the joint
  • Deformed shoulder that seems visibly out of place
  • Inflammation and bruising
  • Inability to move the joint 

Diagnosis:

The orthopedic doctor may conduct a physical examination to check for deformities in the shoulder joint. He may also ask the patient about history of any similar injury. X-ray and other imaging tests may be conducted to confirm a Shoulder Dislocation.

Treatment:

  • Medication: Anti-inflammatory medications or muscle relaxants can be prescribed by the orthopedic doctor to reduce discomfort.
  • Immobilization: The doctor may recommend using a splint or a sling to provide support to the shoulder and restrict its movement. The duration of wearing the sling may depend on the severity of the condition.
  • Closed reduction: This procedure involves manually putting the dislocated shoulder back into the socket. An anesthetic or a muscle relaxant may be administered before the procedure. Thereafter, the orthopedic doctor may apply gentle maneuvers to put the bone back into their original position.
  • Surgery: In case of damaged nerves and blood vessels or a fragile shoulder joint, surgical intervention may be required. Surgery is also sometimes recommended for patients who have suffered repeated episodes of shoulder dislocations.
  • Physical therapy: After the removal of the splint, physical therapy may be required for restoration of normal motion and strength of the shoulder joint.

We, at OrthoTexas, provide comprehensive diagnosis and treatment for Shoulder Dislocation. To schedule an appointment with our orthopedic surgeons in Plano, TX, you can call at (972) 985 – 1072.

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Orthopedic Treatment For Achilles Tendinitis

by Administrator 23. January 2015 11:15

Achilles tendon is a tissue connecting the heel bone to the calf muscles at the exterior of the lower leg. It is used while walking, running or jumping. Constant and rigorous physical activity can cause overuse injuries and degeneration of the tissue, a condition known as Achilles Tendinitis. Although it is mostly seen in runners, the condition is also common in middle aged people who are involved in sports like basketball or tennis.

Depending upon the damaged part of the tendon, Achilles Tendinitis can be classified as:

  • Non-insertional Achilles Tendinitis: In this, the fibers in the middle part of the tendon begin to degenerate and cause pain.
  • Insertional Achilles Tendinitis: It affects he tendon from where it attaches to the heel bone.

Causes

The most common cause of Achilles Tendinitis is excessive exercise, particularly in athletes. People with Rheumatoid Arthritis are also prone to develop the condition. Other cause may include:

  • Exercising without proper warm-up
  • Strained calf muscles due to repetitive physical activity
  • Playing sports that involve sudden change of movements, such as tennis
  • Wearing high heeled footwear regularly
  • Wearing ill-fitted or worn out shoes

Symptoms

  • Pain along the Achilles tendon, particularly in morning
  • Pain at the tendon or back of heel
  • Pain increases after a physical activity
  • Bone spurs, in some cases
  • Stiffening of the tendon
  • Severe pain after exercise
  • Swelling that worsens at the end of the day

Diagnosis

To diagnose Achilles Tendinitis, the orthopedic surgeon may recommend certain imaging tests such as CT scan, X-rays and MRI. He will also evaluate the alignment, flexibility, range of motion and reflexes of the affected foot.

Treatment

  • Applying Ice: Giving ample rest to the heel and applying ice pack on the painful area can help to reduce inflammation and swelling.
  • Medications: The orthopedic surgeon may prescribe anti-inflammatory medications to reduce pain and inflammation.
  • Exercises: The patient may also be recommended to do certain stretching and strengthening exercises to boost the healing of the inflamed tendon.
  • Orthotic Devices: Wearing shoe inserts or wedge that keeps the heel marginally raised can help to relieve strain on the tendon. Providing a cushioning to the heel reduces the force exerted on the Achilles tendon.
  • Surgery: If the condition does not improve with non-surgical approaches or if the tendon is torn, the orthopedic surgeon may prescribe surgery to treat the condition.

For diagnosis and treatment of Achilles Tendinitis, visit the orthopedic surgeons at OrthoTexas, Carrollton, TX. To schedule an appointment, you can call at (972) 492 – 1334.

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