Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness: Orthopedic Carrollton

by Administrator 18. August 2017 09:10

Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) is a muscle related pain that occurs due to excessive exercising. Simultaneous contraction and lengthening of the muscles, in most cases, is the underlying cause of this condition. Running downhill, squatting, plyometric exercises are typical examples. Such microtraumas may cause an imbalance between the electrolyte as well as intramuscular fluids present in the body. This affects the muscle’s capacity to absorb shocks, maintain coordination and their ability to contract. This condition typically affects the athletes and is considered to be the body’s natural way to adapt to the change in physical activity. In most people, it is an occasional phenomenon, but in others DOMS can be chronic.

Causes

  • Myofibril tears or muscular strain
  • Excessive exercising
  • Performing an exercise that the body is not accustomed to
  • Presence of biochemical markers such as lactic dehydrogenase leads to  disruption of the muscle fibres
  • Younger athletes are more susceptible to DOMS because their bodies are not yet conditioned for rigorous exercise regimes
  • Enzyme efflux- microtrauma to the muscle fibres leads to accumulation of calcium in the muscles leading to breakdown of cellular respiration and consequent degeneration of muscle proteins
  • Sudden change in intensity of the exercise

Symptoms

  • A dull muscular pain may occur within 24-48 hours of exercise
  • Tenderness and stiffness in muscles around the joint
  • Localized pain and discomfort
  • Range of motion may be affected
  • Swelling
  • Increased pain while walking down the stairs
  • Pain may subside with rest and reoccur if the activity is resumed

Diagnosis

  • A thorough physical check by an orthopedic doctor or a physical therapist
  • Ultrasound may be used to check for muscle tears
  • Range of motion of the affected part may be tested

Treatment

  • The doctor may recommend adequate rest to allow the muscles to settle down
  • Anti-inflammatory medicines and muscle relaxants may be prescribed
  • Application of ice packs
  • Heat pads may be helpful in reducing muscle pain
  • Muscle strengthening exercises should be avoided
  • It is important to cool down and warm up after and before an exercise to prevent reoccurrence of DOMS
  • Mild stretching, walking, swimming and cycling may help to alleviate muscle soreness
  • Prescription of some enzyme based medicines may reduce inflammation
  • The doctor may ask the patient to increase the intake of vitamin C
  • Medical grade compression garments such as socks or calf sleeves may provide support to the muscles and prevent muscle strains

To know more about the treatment options available for Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS), get in touch with the doctors at OrthoTexas. You can request an appointment by calling at (972) 492 – 1334.

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Irritable Hip Syndrome: Orthopedic Carrollton

by Administrator 6. April 2017 15:30

Irritable Hip Syndrome, also known as the Toxic or Transient Synovitis, is a condition that affects the hip joint in children. It may affect any child between the age of 4-10 years and boys are more prone than girls. The condition is attributed to the inflammation of the synovial membrane that lines and protects the joint. It generally does not cause any further complication.

Causes

  • Viral infection that may occur in chest or digestive system
  • Injury to the hip joint
  • Bone fractures in the joint
  • Infection in the upper respiratory tract

Symptoms

  • Stiffness in the joint
  • Severe pain in hip, knee, groin  or leg
  • The child may not want to put weight on the affected leg
  • Limping and change in gait of the child
  • Very young children may keep crying when the pain sets in
  • Movement may be restricted
  • Slight rise in body temperature
  • The child may tend to hold the hip outwards, slightly bent away from the body
  • Tenderness
  • The condition may develop slowly with only one side of the joint being affected at first
  • Muscle spasm
  • Redness in the affected part of the leg

Diagnosis

  • Analysis of the patient’s medical history and lifestyle besides the symptoms reported
  • X-ray imaging
  • Bone tests to check for bone growth and infections
  • Blood tests
  • MRI or CT scan
  • Ultrasound test may help reveal fluid accumulation in the joint
  • Aspiration in case fluid is present in the joint to check for infections
  • Palpation to check for joint tenderness and locate the exact location of pain
  • Log roll test- the whole joint is rotated outwards to see if there is any involuntary resistance by the supporting muscles (muscle guarding)
  • Neurological tests may be conducted to rule out other causes such as developmental dysplasia of the hip joint

Treatment

  • The patient is advised to rest and abstain from any strenuous activity for a couple of weeks
  • Medication may be prescribed to relieve pain and swelling
  • Application of heat pads relieves muscular stress
  • Certain physical therapy exercises may improve blood flow and provide relief
  • Traction (manual) may be applied to the affected leg to release stress from the joint. This is done by attaching weight bearing pulley to the leg and then stretching it.

To know more about the treatment options for Irritable Hip Syndrome, contact OrthoTexas at (972) 492 - 1334.

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Growth Plate Fractures: Treatment In Carrollton, TX

by Administrator 27. February 2017 02:52

The growth plate is a mass of cartilage tissue that is found around the edges of the long bones such as the femur, ulna and the radius. Each of these bones has at least two growth plates at their ends and the bone development occurs around these plates.

The growth plate tends to harden or ossify at the end of the growth cycle of the child once the bones have attained their full length. These are weak soft tissue structures that can break with slight external pressure or overuse.
It is estimated that about 30% of the fractures reported during childhood or in young adults, pertain to growth plates. Being soft, this part of the bone is essentially prone to cracks or damage. It becomes imperative to treat such injuries at the earliest as they are crucial determinants of the child’s growth level.

Causes

  • A fall on an outstretched hand or knee
  • Vehicular accidents may have a high impact and crack the bone shaft along with the growth plate
  • Collisions or direct hit to the limb
  • Repeated stress to the joints and the growth plate leading to stress fracture
  • Recreational activities such as biking, skateboarding, skiing etc. may increase the risk of such fractures
  • Growth plate fractures are more common in boys as compared to girls as the latter attain maturity earlier and therefore their growth plates ossify sooner

Symptoms

  • Visibly deformed limb
  • Pain may set in immediately after the injury and may range from severe, localized to persistent
  • A feeling of warmth may spread over the skin around the injured limb
  • Swelling and tenderness
  • Inability to perform daily tasks
  • Limited range of motion

Diagnosis

  • The patient’s medical history, symptoms as well as mode and time of injury may be noted down
  • X-ray imaging may be required to study the damage to the bone structure
  • MRI or CT scan may be done to locate the fracture in the growth plate which is a soft tissue structure

Treatment

The treatment method adopted in each case may differ depending on the child’s age, grade of injury, location of fracture as well as the overall health. These may include the following.

  • Immobilization of the limb using a cast or splint to keep the bones in place while they heal
  • Restricting the levels of patient’s daily activities
  • Some pain killers and anti inflammatory medicines may be prescribed
  • Open Reduction- If unstable fractures are accompanied by bone displacements, surgery may be required. During the procedure, an incision is made to reposition the bone pieces. They are then held in place using screws and pins
  • The limb is secured in a cast post surgery and physical therapy may be recommended
  • Regular follow ups may be required until the child attains maturity to keep a check on the development of the bone

For treatment of Growth Plate Fractures and other orthopedic conditions, visit OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment, call at (972) 492 – 1334 or visit 4780 North Josey Lane, Carrollton, TX 75010.

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Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 22. October 2016 06:22

Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE) is a medical condition that affects the hip joint of people in their teen age. The hip is a ball and socket joint in which the head of the femur (thigh bone) rests in the socket referred to as the acetabulum. The femur has two plates at either end of the bone where the bone growth occurs. In some adolescents, the rounded head of the bone tends to slip out of the socket in the backwards direction causing pain and discomfort. A break or fracture in the growth plate causes instability of the femoral head (also known as capital) and it tends to slip out of its socket. This condition can be classified into two categories:

  • Stable SCFE- This is a less severe condition in which the person is able to bear body weight without the use of orthotic devices
  • Unstable SCFE- This condition creates a severe instability and the patient is unable to bear body weight

Causes

  • Genetic traits- People with a family history of SCFE are more likely to be affected
  • Metabolic disorders- Hyperthyroidism and Hypopituitarism are major risk factors for this condition
  • Obesity- People suffering from SCFE have been found to be overweight in most cases

Symptoms

  • Pain in the groin, thigh, hip and knee
  • Physical deformity in the legs
  • Limping
  • Inability to bear body weight
  • Muscle spasms

Diagnosis

  • Detailed examination of the affected leg and the hip
  • Analysis of the patient’s medical, genetic history, past injuries and existing symptoms
  • Evaluation of the gait
  • Physical tests may be performed to check for loss in range of motion
  • X-ray imaging is done to study the position of the bone and it helps confirm the diagnosis

Treatment

  • The aim of the treatment is to realign the bones and enable the patient to move freely. The patient is generally required to undergo surgical treatment within 2-3 days of diagnosis.
  • In-situ Fixation- A small incision is made in the hip. Screws and wires are used to fix the growth plates. This prevents the bone from slipping out and eventually the growth plates close once the patient attains maturity. This process is best suited in case of stable SCFE.
  • Open Reduction- A large incision is made in the affected joint and the bone is placed back in its original position. It is then fixed using screws
  • Post-operative care- The doctor may recommend using crutches to avoid bearing weight for a few weeks. Specific physical therapy sessions may be conducted to restore movement.

We at OrthoTexas, provide effective treatment for Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis. To schedule an appointment with the orthopedic doctors in Carrolton, TX, visit (972) 492 – 1334.

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