How To Get Rid Of Hip Pain

by Administrator 31. August 2017 15:54

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Treatment For Rib Stress Fractures

by Administrator 30. August 2017 02:19

Fractures may result either from trauma or from stress. Traumatic fractures result from a single instance of injury or trauma which results in a fractured bone; stress fractures, on the other hand, stem from continued excessive stress over an extended period of time and are more in the nature of ‘overuse injuries’. Stress fractures cannot usually be found through x-rays because the fractures are very small; however, stress fractures can deteriorate to become major fractures if they are not detected and treated in time.

Any of the 24 ribs (12 on either side) may suffer a fracture, traumatic or stress. Usually, it is the first rib that is more prone to a fracture because of certain anatomical features which make the first rib relatively weak in some places.

Stress rib fractures are fairly uncommon but they are often found in athletes whose activities place extreme stress on the ribs, as in the case of rowers, dancers, golfers, tennis-players, etc.

Causes

  • Repetitive, extreme stress stemming from vigorous movement of the shoulders as in certain sports. 
  • Poor or incorrect technique in sports that involve excessive use of shoulders
  • Sudden changes in weightlifting training
  • Deficiency of Calcium and Vitamin D
  • Weakness of bones
  • Damaged or worn-out training equipment
  • Weak rib muscles which increase the stress on ribs
  • Stiffness of the joints between the ribs and vertebrae
  • Age, which often results in reduced bone density
  • Gender, women being more likely to be affected because of the effect of female hormones

Symptoms

  • Pain in the chest and/ or back developing gradually
  • Pain gradually develops in the upper back and side of the neck
  • Pain in the back of the shoulder
  • Coughing, sneezing aggravates pain
  • Pain while breathing, particularly while taking deep breaths
  • Pain occurs with overhead movement of arms
  • Routine physical exercises like push-ups and sit-ups can be uncomfortable
  • Pain on pushing heavy objects
  • Pain ameliorating from rest
  • Tender, palpable formations of callus around the fractured area

Diagnosis

  • Physical examination to reveal the site and probable cause of pain
  • Pressure may be applied on the affected rib or on the trapezius muscle at the base of the neck to check if it causes pain
  • X-ray can show major cracks and also reveal the formation of callus or scar tissue around the cracks
  • Bone Scan where a dye is injected into the body
  • MRI Scan
  • CT Scan

Treatment

  • The preferred treatment is rest for 4 to 6 weeks during which no activity which causes or aggravates the pain should be undertaken
  • During the rest period, painless exercises are allowed to avoid muscular atrophy
  • Ice packs when pain is severe can provide relief
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication may be prescribed
  • Supplements of Vitamin D and Calcium may be taken
  • Balanced diet to correct nutritional imbalances is recommended
  • Improvement/modification of technique and posture while training or exerting
  • Changes in training – which may involve duration, type and other factors
  • Surgery in extremely rare cases to correct any nerve-compression arising from the callus formed during healing

Visit the doctors at OrthoTexas for complete treatment of Rib Stress Fracture. To schedule an appointment, call at (972) 899 – 4679 or visit 4951 Long Prairie Rd, Suite 100, Flower Mound, TX 75028.

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Nutrition Guide For Healthy Bones

by Administrator 28. August 2017 11:20

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10 Habits That Cause Back Pain

by Administrator 25. August 2017 10:19

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Types Of Knee Injuries

by Administrator 21. August 2017 11:34

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Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness: Orthopedic Carrollton

by Administrator 18. August 2017 09:10

Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) is a muscle related pain that occurs due to excessive exercising. Simultaneous contraction and lengthening of the muscles, in most cases, is the underlying cause of this condition. Running downhill, squatting, plyometric exercises are typical examples. Such microtraumas may cause an imbalance between the electrolyte as well as intramuscular fluids present in the body. This affects the muscle’s capacity to absorb shocks, maintain coordination and their ability to contract. This condition typically affects the athletes and is considered to be the body’s natural way to adapt to the change in physical activity. In most people, it is an occasional phenomenon, but in others DOMS can be chronic.

Causes

  • Myofibril tears or muscular strain
  • Excessive exercising
  • Performing an exercise that the body is not accustomed to
  • Presence of biochemical markers such as lactic dehydrogenase leads to  disruption of the muscle fibres
  • Younger athletes are more susceptible to DOMS because their bodies are not yet conditioned for rigorous exercise regimes
  • Enzyme efflux- microtrauma to the muscle fibres leads to accumulation of calcium in the muscles leading to breakdown of cellular respiration and consequent degeneration of muscle proteins
  • Sudden change in intensity of the exercise

Symptoms

  • A dull muscular pain may occur within 24-48 hours of exercise
  • Tenderness and stiffness in muscles around the joint
  • Localized pain and discomfort
  • Range of motion may be affected
  • Swelling
  • Increased pain while walking down the stairs
  • Pain may subside with rest and reoccur if the activity is resumed

Diagnosis

  • A thorough physical check by an orthopedic doctor or a physical therapist
  • Ultrasound may be used to check for muscle tears
  • Range of motion of the affected part may be tested

Treatment

  • The doctor may recommend adequate rest to allow the muscles to settle down
  • Anti-inflammatory medicines and muscle relaxants may be prescribed
  • Application of ice packs
  • Heat pads may be helpful in reducing muscle pain
  • Muscle strengthening exercises should be avoided
  • It is important to cool down and warm up after and before an exercise to prevent reoccurrence of DOMS
  • Mild stretching, walking, swimming and cycling may help to alleviate muscle soreness
  • Prescription of some enzyme based medicines may reduce inflammation
  • The doctor may ask the patient to increase the intake of vitamin C
  • Medical grade compression garments such as socks or calf sleeves may provide support to the muscles and prevent muscle strains

To know more about the treatment options available for Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS), get in touch with the doctors at OrthoTexas. You can request an appointment by calling at (972) 492 – 1334.

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Swimmer’s Shoulder: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 14. August 2017 17:53

Swimming may place severe stress on the shoulder and other parts of the body. Swimmer’s Shoulder, also known as the Impingement Syndrome, refers to a wide set of symptoms relating to traumatic injuries stemming from undue exertion over an extended period of time, i.e. overuse, of the various parts of the shoulder while swimming. Pain is an inevitable result of such exertion and may be limited to the shoulder joint and muscles or spread in either direction - to the extremities and neck. The condition involves chronic inflammation of the muscles, ligaments and tendons of the joint.

Causes

  • Excessive training without proper rest or breaks
  • Overuse of the shoulder joint
  • Bad swimming technique
  • Inadequate ‘body roll’
  • Imbalanced development of various muscle groups
  • Inherent weakness of muscles, ligaments, and tendons of the shoulder
  • Subsisting shoulder injuries may be an underlying cause

Symptoms

  • Localized pain is felt in the affected part of the shoulder
  • Pain may extend to the neck and/or down the arm in some cases
  • Pain worsens while resting on the affected shoulder
  • Tenderness of the affected area
  • Decreased range of movement
  • Decrease in shoulder strength
  • Increased joint laxity

Diagnosis

  • Physical examination is the first step in the process of diagnosis
  • X-rays and other imagining techniques may be needed to assess the changes in structure of the joint
  • The doctor may check for any change in the pattern of swimming stroke
  • The presence of ‘lazy elbow’ where the elbow on the affected side cannot be lifted to the normal height out of the water.

Treatment

  • Rest is important to allow the joint to heal
  • Application of ice packs may be recommended to reduce pain and inflammation
  • Sling or shoulder tape may give adequate support
  • Physiotherapy sessions may be recommended to improve strength and flexibility
  • Anti-inflammatory medication may be prescribed
  • Surgical repair of tendons and ligaments may be done in case conservative methods do not work
  • Improvement or modification of swimming technique may be required
  • Warming up slowly before swimming may be suggested
  • The doctor may ask patients to avoid movements that cause pain

For complete diagnosis and treatment of Swimmer’s Shoulder, call at (972) 727 – 9995 or visit 1125 Raintree Circle, Suites 100/100A, Allen, TX 75013.

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Thoracic Outlet Syndrome: Orthopedic Treatment In Plano, TX

by Administrator 10. August 2017 08:19

Compression of the nerves or blood vessels in the space that lies between the collar bone and the first rib is referred to as Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (TOS). A network of nerves known as the brachial plexus emerges from the spine and spreads out to the shoulder, neck, arms and hands. These nerves control the sensation in these parts of the body. Compression of the brachial plexus may result in a host of symptoms.

Causes

  • Trauma due to vehicular accident (Whiplash injury)
  • Congenital anatomical disorders such as presence of an extra rib bone
  • Pregnancy related changes in the body
  • Occupational injuries
  • Overuse, repeated stress and trauma caused to the thoracic part
  • Carrying heavy weight backpacks
  • Athletes such as golfers, swimmers may develop this condition
  • Compression of the thoracic area due to bad postural habits
  • Tightening of the fibrous band which connects the rib to the spine
  • Females are at a higher risk
  • Mental stress
  • Tumor in the chest or underarm

Symptoms

  • Numbness in the fingers
  • Pain in the shoulder, neck and thoracic region
  • Pin worsens with movement
  • There may be muscle wasting in the fleshy part at the base of the thumb
  • Tingling sensation in the arms, neck and hands
  • The grip may become weak
  • The hand may develop a bluish colour
  • Blood clots may lead to swelling in the affected part
  • A throbbing sensation in the collar bone

Diagnosis

  • The patient’s lifestyle, activities and occupational details may be analyzed
  • The patient may be asked to move the arm, neck, shoulders and hands to check for symptoms
  • Details of medical history may be taken
  • Some provocation may be done to recreate the symptoms and assess the condition
  • X-ray imaging
  • Ultrasound test
  • MRI and CT Scan
  • Angiography
  • Nerve conduction test
  • EMG or electromyography

Treatment

  • Most patients can be treated by conservative methods of treatment. These may include the following.
  • Physical therapy may be recommended in most cases to strengthen the shoulder and neck muscles
  • Prescription of anticoagulants to prevent or dissolve blood clots
  • Pain relief measures may include medicines, anti inflammatory medicines and muscle relaxants
  • Thoracic Outlet Decompression- a surgical process to reduce the pressure on the veins or arteries in the affected part. This may be done to remove a part of the rib or the muscle that causes pressure on the artery or vein
  • In some cases a damaged part of the nerve or the vein is removed and it is replaced by a nerve graft

Consult the doctors at OrthoTexas for treatment of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome. For an appointment, call at (972) 985 – 1072 or visit 4031 West Plano Parkway, Suite 100, Plano, TX 75093.

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