Fracture after Total Hip Replacement: Orthopedic Carrollton

by Administrator 31. January 2017 10:33

A break or crack in the artificial implant during or after the hip replacement process is termed as a periprosthetic fracture. It may occur in any part of the artificial implant although it is most commonly seen in the stem of the metallic component that is fixed within the femur. Treatment for this condition is surgical and it can be quite complicated as the  patients are generally old in age and the bone structure has already weakened.

Causes

  • A fall on the ground
  • Vehicular accidents that cause high intensity trauma to the joint
  • Direct blow to the leg or hip
  • People suffering from Osteoporosis are at a higher risk
  • Inherent muscular weakness may decrease the stability of the joint and predispose a person to such injuries
  • Osteolysis- The bones may begin to thin out with age and this may lead to the loosening of the femoral stem

Symptoms

  • Severe pain around the hip and thigh
  • Swelling
  • Bruising
  • Discrepancy in the limb length as the injured leg tends to shorten
  • Limited range of motion
  • Inability to bear body weight

Diagnosis

  • Detailed examination of the hip joint
  • Nerve testing to ensure the blood flow to the lower limbs is not affected
  • CT scan may be required to obtain a 3D image of the hip joint
  • Blood tests may be conducted to assess the general health condition of the patient
  • X-ray images of the pelvis, thigh and hip area may be required to analyze the severity of damage to the implant as well as surrounding bones

Treatment

  • Weight bearing should be restricted to avoid stressing the joint
  • Traction may be used in some cases to straighten the leg and keep the bones in place
  • Open Reduction- A surgical procedure that may be recommended if the implant is still secure within the femur. The broken bones are surgically placed back in their position and fastened using screws or pins (internal fixation)
  • Bone graft may be required in some cases as it helps in healing the fracture.
  • Surgical replacement of the damaged implant. This process is called Joint Revision
  • Blood thinning medications may be prescribed post surgery to prevent clotting in the leg or hip
  • Anti-inflammatory medications to relieve pain
  • Physical therapy may be recommended to promote joint movement during recovery phase
  • A hip brace may be worn for a few weeks to prevent stress on the joint

For treatment of periprosthetic fracture and other hip conditions, visit OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment with the hip specialists in Carrollton, TX, call at (972) 492-1334 or visit 4780 North Josey Lane, Carrollton, TX 75010.

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Orthopedic Treatment For Stiff Neck

by Administrator 28. January 2017 19:27

Stiff Neck is a common problem that affects all people irrespective of gender or age. It is characterized by a sprain or strain of the soft tissues in the neck. The neck represents the upper part of the spinal canal that begins at the base of the skull. It comprises of 7 cervical vertebrae that are surrounded by the ligaments, nerves, blood vessels and muscles. Stress or injury to any of these constituent parts may lead to Stiff Neck.

Causes

  • Sleeping in an awkward position may stress the soft tissues
  • Prolonged working on the computer
  • Poor postural habits
  • Stress or anxiety
  • Acute Torticollis- Waking up with the neck twisted on one particular side
  • Carrying heavy weight above the head or on one shoulder
  • Cervical Spondylosis- Wear and tear of neck ligaments due to age and overuse
  • Whiplash- Sudden jerk to the neck caused by an external force or vehicular accident
  • Falls
  • Pinched Nerve
  • Sports injury

Symptoms

  • Pain in the head, neck, shoulders and may radiate down to the arms
  • Stiffness and difficulty in moving the neck
  • Muscle spasms around the neck and shoulders
  • The patient may feel a tingling sensation or pricks in the neck, arms and fingers
  • Numbness in the limbs and upper body
  • The muscles around the neck may feel swollen or tender

Diagnosis

  • Details of the patient’s medical history, lifestyle and occupation may be taken into consideration
  • The patient may be asked to move the neck, shoulder and arms to check for range of motion
  • Palpation may be done to check for swelling
  • X-ray imaging may be required in some cases to diagnose the underlying cause
  • MRI and CT scan may help in identifying injuries to the soft tissue structures

Treatment

In most cases, Stiff Neck is not a serious condition and the symptoms can be managed through conservative treatment methods. These may include the following:

  • Heat pads may be used around the affected area to alleviate stiffness and pain
  • Ice packs may also be applied to prevent inflammation and improve blood circulation
  • Pain killers and anti inflammatory medicines may be prescribed by the orthopedic doctor
  • Avoid using laptop and maintain a good posture till the pain subsides
  • A soft neck collar may be helpful but it should be used only for a couple of days
  • Use a soft  pillow to rest the head
  • Gentle exercises may be helpful in improving flexibility of the neck and upper body

For treatment of Stiff Neck and other medical conditions, visit OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment with the orthopedic doctors in Allen, TX, you can call at (972) 727 - 9995.

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Flexible Flatfoot in Children: Orthopedic Treatment In Frisco

by Administrator 25. January 2017 04:04

Flexible Flatfoot, or Pes Planus, is a condition that causes the arch of the foot to temporarily collapse. The arch is not visible when the child stands and re-appears while sitting or when the foot is left hanging freely. The condition may be congenital and affects both the feet. In most cases, it gets resolved as the child attains the age of 5 years. It is considered serious if the child feels pain or does not develop an arch even after this age.

Flexible Flatfoot usually does not hinder the foot’s movement or ability of the child to participate in physical activities. With the growth of the bones and soft tissue structures, the child tends to develop a normal arch.

Causes

  • Flexible Flatfoot may be an inherited problem
  • A tight Achilles tendon may cause the arch to collapse

Symptoms

  • Pain may be felt at the base of the foot or near the arch
  • Visibly flattened foot while weight bearing
  • Altered gait
  • The child may complain of stiffness or tiredness after a physical activity. He may also feel pain in the legs and knees
  • Shoes may be worn out on the inner side due to the inward tilt of the foot (overpronation)

Diagnosis

  • Detailed examination of the feet to check if the collapse of arch is rigid or flexible
  • Details of the family history may be taken into consideration
  • The doctor may ask the child to stand on toes, sit, walk or stand to check for the deformity
  • X-ray examination may be required to check the bone structure and condition of the Achilles tendon besides other soft tissue structures

Treatment

Treatment for Flexible Flatfoot generally includes conservative methods. Some of them are:

  • Use of orthotic devices or shoe inserts can help in maintaining the arch and relieving the pain
  • Specific stretching exercises may be practised for eliminating the symptoms and improving the functionality of the joint
  • Physical therapy sessions may help to reduce the tightness in the Achilles’ tendon and improve the foot biomechanics
  • Surgery may be recommended if the condition worsens or persists beyond adolescence. It may be done to relieve the tight Achilles tendon
  • Surgical lengthening of the heel bone using a bone graft may be required in some cases

OrthoTexas provides comprehensive diagnosis and treatment for Flexible Flatfoot in children. To schedule an appointment with the foot doctors in Frisco, TX, you can call at (214) 618-5502.

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Pediatric Scoliosis: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 21. January 2017 19:09

Scoliosis can be defined as the development of an abnormal spine curvature due to excessive rotation between the vertebrae. When this condition affects adolescents and children, it is classified as Pediatric Scoliosis. It is most commonly seen in the thoracic region of the spine. Depending upon its cause, the condition can be categorized as:

  • Congenital Scoliosis- This type of scoliosis is present at the time of birth
  • Idiopathic Scoliosis- It has no apparent cause but is diagnosed in children with one or more family members having Scoliosis
  • Neuromuscular Scoliosis- Patients suffering from medical conditions that cause abnormalities in the spinal nerves and muscles develop this category of Scoliosis

Pediatric Scoliosis may range from mild (less than 25 degrees of curvature) to severe (more than 45 degree curvature) with total spinal deformity. The former one generally does not require treatment except for regular monitoring to check the progression of the condition. Severe cases of Pediatric Scoliosis however need proper treatment.

Causes

  • Genetic factors may promote development of Pediatric Scoliosis
  • Improper development of the vertebrae or inability of the bones to fuse properly in the embryonic stage.
  • Trauma caused to the child at the time of birth or during the gestation period may also be a cause
  • Neuromuscular disorders such as Muscular Dystrophy, Cerebral Palsy, Spina Bifida etc. may result in abnormal spine curvature as in this case the muscles are weak and cannot lend stability to the spinal cord
  • Strain on the abdominal muscles may cause the spine to develop an abnormal curve

Symptoms

  • The typical symptoms of Pediatric Scoliosis may be one or more of the following
  • Unevenness in the level of right and left shoulder
  • The child may tend to lean to one side of the body
  • The hip and waist may be elevated on one side
  • The child may limp while walking
  • Fatigue may be experienced while performing physical tasks
  • Some cases may show changes in skin color around the affected part of the spine

Diagnosis

  • A detailed evaluation of the child’s medical and family history
  • Physical examination to check for the changes or abnormalities in the shape as well as angle of the chest, legs, shoulders, hips, legs, waist and pelvis
  • Adam's forward bend test - The child may be asked to bend forward to view the shape of the spine and changes in rib cage, if any
  • The length of the limbs may be measured
  • X-ray imaging may be required cases to assess the bone structure

Treatment

  • The treatment option depends on the degree of curvature and the child’s age which indicates the growth years remaining to attain structural maturity.
  • Regular monitoring for 4-6 months may be recommended for mild cases of Pediatric Scoliosis to check if the condition is stable or progressive
  • Customized braces may be worn under the clothes to keep the spine stable. It may help to prevent the condition from progressing and is generally recommended if the curve is between 25 and 45 degrees
  • A Scoliotic curve that is progressive and larger than 45 degrees may require surgical intervention. This is done to fuse the affected vertebrae in order to stop the progression of the condition
  • Surgical realignment of the vertebrae may be done and the spine may be held in a normal position by inserting metal rods, screws or pins

For diagnosis and treatment of Pediatric Scoliosis, visit OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment with the spine specialists in Plano, TX, you can call at (972) 985 – 1072.

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Chronic Shoulder Instability: Orthopedic Denton

by Administrator 18. January 2017 18:40

The shoulder is one of the most mobile joints of the body which is made up of three main bones, the upper arm bone (humerus), shoulder blade (scapula) and collar bone (clavicle). However, the extensive range of motion of the joint makes it prone to injuries and instability. The upper end of the humerus fits into a cavity within the shoulder blade known as glenoid. It is held in place by strong ligament structures but an external trauma or overuse may push the humeral head out of the socket, leaving the joint unstable. Once it occurs, the shoulder tends to become susceptible to repeated incidences of injury. This condition is medically termed as Chronic Shoulder Instability. It may lead to partial or complete displacement of the humeral head.

Causes

  • Injury or trauma- A sudden injury to the shoulder or arm may push the humerus out of the glenoid. This occurs as a result of damage to the ligaments, tendons and cartilage structures that support the bones. Weak connective tissues make the joint prone to repeated episodes of instability
  • Bankart Lesion-  Damage to the cartilage lining between the humeral head and glenoid may make the shoulder unstable
  • Stress caused due to activities that require repeated overhead movement of the arm, such as swimming, playing tennis, painting etc., may loosen the ligaments
  • Inherent weakness of the muscles and soft tissue structures that support the shoulder joint. They tend to suffer from multi-directional instability and the bone may slip out from the glenoid in different directions
  • Double jointed- Excessive flexibility of the shoulder joint may also increase the risk of instability

Symptoms

  • Pain in the upper arm, neck and shoulder
  • Weakness
  • Feeling that the shoulder may give away
  • Frequent subluxations may occur

Diagnosis

  • Patient’s medical history and shoulder injuries may be taken into consideration by the orthopedic doctor
  • The patient may be asked to move the arm in different directions to check for the range of motion
  • X-ray imaging may be conducted to assess the extent of damage to the joint
  • MRI scan may be required to study the condition of the soft tissue structures

Treatment

Chronic Shoulder Instability can be treated through conservative methods initially but if the symptoms do not subside or the condition weakens, surgery may be required. Treatment may include the following:

  • Some lifestyle changes and modification of the daily activities may be suggested to relieve the symptoms. Any task that requires overhead movement of the arm should be avoided
  • Physical therapy program may be initiated to increase the strength of the supporting muscles in the joint.
  • A sling may be worn to provide support to the joint and allow the bone to get back to its original position
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines may also be prescribed by the orthopedic doctor
  • In severe cases, cortisone injections may be administered directly into the joint
  • Surgical repair of weak or torn ligaments and reattaching them to the bone to increase stability
  • Arthroscopic surgery may be performed to remove damaged cartilage and any loose fragments within the joint

OrthoTexas provides effective treatment for Chronic Shoulder Instability and other medical conditions. To schedule an appointment with the orthopedic doctors in Denton, TX, you can call at (940) 382-1577.

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Adolescent Anterior Knee Pain: Orthopedic Treatment

by Administrator 14. January 2017 07:47

Adolescent Anterior Knee Pain is a medical condition that affects physically active teenagers. It is characterized by pain and discomfort in the area surrounding the kneecap. The knee is the largest and one of the most complex joints comprising of three bones, femur, tibia and patella. Various ligaments and tendons support these bones as well as hold them in place. Stress or damage to any of these parts can lead to Adolescent Anterior Knee Pain. The condition is more commonly seen in girls as compared to boys.

Causes

  • Overuse of the joint
  • Sudden change in the intensity and technique of physical activity
  • Weak quadriceps or hamstring muscles
  • Inherent defects in alignment of the kneecap, leg and hip joint
  • Wearing ill-fitted shoes
  • Incorrect exercise or sports technique
  • Tight ligaments in the knee joint

Symptoms

  • Dull and persistent ache that may increase following a physical activity or exercise
  • Pain may also occur while resting
  • Difficulty in squatting, climbing stairs, weight lifting and running
  • Cracking or locking sensation around the knee joint while moving
  • Discomfort while getting up after prolonged sitting
  • Feeling of the joint being unstable
  • Swelling around the kneecap

Diagnosis

  • Physical examination which may include palpation, observing the shape of the kneecap, tightness of the ligaments and other visible symptoms
  • Range of motion tests may be done by asking the patient to perform some physical movements such as jumping, walking, bending, squatting etc.
  • The patient’s medical history and lifestyle details may be taken into consideration by the knee specialist
  • X-ray imaging may be conducted to assess the anatomical changes in the kneecap and other supporting structures
  • MRI scan may help to diagnose damage to the soft tissues

Treatment

Adolescent Anterior Knee Pain can be treated through conservative methods. Some of them are listed below:

  • Use of comfortable shoes that provide adequate support to the feet and prevent stress to the knee joint
  • The intensity and duration of physical activity must be reduced till the symptoms subside. Any exercise or sport that may lead to pain should be avoided
  • Anti-inflammatory medicines may be prescribed by the doctor to relieve pain
  • Hamstring and quadriceps muscle strengthening exercises may be recommended to provide better support to the knee
  • Application of ice packs at regular intervals may help to alleviate pain and swelling
  • Orthotic devices such as shoe inserts or molded arch supports can be used to combat pain and discomfort
  • Regular physical therapy sessions may help  to enhance flexibility and range of motion

The orthopedic surgeons at OrthoTexas provide complete treatment for Adolescent Anterior Knee Pain. Patients in Allen, TX can call at (972) 727-9995 for appointment.

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Radiculopathy: Orthopedic Treatment In McKinney

by Administrator 10. January 2017 13:26

Radiculopathy is a medical condition that occurs when a nerve in the spine gets pinched or irritated. There are several nerves or ‘nerve roots’ that emerge from the intervertebral joints and spread out into different parts of the body, thus controlling their movement as well as sensation. Radiculopathy may affect the cervical, thoracic or lower spine. However, it is most commonly observed in the lumbar portion. The cervical spine controls the neck and the arms, the abdomen and chest are controlled by the thoracic spine while the legs, hips and the feet are affected by the lumbar spine. The location of the pinched nerve determines which part of the body will have the symptoms.

Causes

  • Activities that lead to overuse or excessive stressing of the spine
  • Injury during contact sports
  • Genetic traits may predispose family members to develop Radiculopathy
  • Doing excessive labor work or lifting heavy weights
  • Disc Herniation may pressurize the nerve as it emerges out of the joint spaces within the spine
  • Osteophytes or bone spurs may put pressure on the spinal nerves
  • Thickening of the ligaments supporting the spine
  • Osteoarthritis of the spine
  • Bone tumor
  • Spinal infection
  • Abnormal curvature of the spine developed due to Scoliosis
  • External trauma

Symptoms

  • Pain which is generally localized depending on the nerve that is pinched. It may occur in the lower back or the neck and may radiate down into the arms, legs, thighs and buttocks
  • Numbness or tingling sensation in the legs and arms
  • The affected part of the spine may feel tender when touched
  • The muscles controlled by the nerve tend to get weak and may also result in Paralysis

Diagnosis

  • The medical and family history of the patient may be taken into consideration
  • A detailed physical examination and analysis of the symptoms reported. The orthopedic doctor may test the range of motion, muscle strength and abnormalities in reflexes, if any
  • X-ray imaging may be done to identify tumors, changes in spine structure, osteophytes etc.
  • MRI or CT scan may be conducted to analyze the location of the affected nerve and condition of soft tissue structures, discs or ligaments
  • An EMG test may be recommended to identify nerve damage

Treatment

  • The patient may be advised to take rest and avoid any activity that causes stress to the back or neck
  • A physical therapy program may be initiated to educate the patient about good postural habits, techniques to perform physical tasks without stressing the spine and exercises to strengthen the supporting structures
  • Lumbar traction may be recommended in some cases to alleviate the nerve compression and create more intervertebral space
  • Injecting steroids directly into the affected part of the spine may help to relieve pain
  • Anti-inflammatory medicines may be prescribed by the doctor
  • Laminectomy- Surgical removal of the bone that compresses the nerve
  • Discectomy- Surgical removal of the Herniated Disc that may be pressing upon the nerve root

For treatment of Radiculopathy and other spine conditions, visit OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment with the orthopedic surgeons in McKinney, TX, you can call at (972) 727 – 9995.

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Spinal Instability: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 6. January 2017 12:31

Spinal Instability or Lumbar Instability is a condition that occurs when the inter-vertebral discs in the spine begin to degenerate. The bulge of the disc decreases and begins to lose height. This causes the vertebrae to displace from their anatomical position and override the disc. It eventually produces friction between the vertebrae, causing pain and several other symptoms. The micro movement within the spine irritates the nerves that emerge out of the joint spaces. The condition may increase the risk of Spinal Arthritis and development of bone spurs. Spinal Instability may also affect the ability of the spine to maintain the body’s structure and movement.

Causes

  • External trauma or fracture of the spine
  • Metastatic tumors in the spine
  • Degenerative Disc Disease
  • Congenital defects in the spinal cord
  • Scoliosis
  • Spondylolisthesis
  • Disorders of the connective tissues
  • Poor lifting techniques

Symptoms

  • Severe pain in the back while lifting objects, bending and straightening the spine
  • A feeling of locking in between a physical activity such as getting up from a chair
  • Muscle spasms
  • Pain may radiate down into the legs and buttocks, generally affecting one side of the body
  • Numbness in the lower extremities and arms
  • The symptoms may get aggravated after prolonged sitting or standing
  • Laughing, coughing or sneezing may also induce pain

Diagnosis

  • Details of the patient’s medical history and lifestyle may be noted down
  • MRI and CT scan Severe pain in the back while lifting objects, bending and straightening the spine
  • X-ray imaging (in a sitting and standing position) may be required to study the changes in the bone structure
  • The doctor may probe the spine to recreate conditions that are likely to cause pain. This helps to diagnose the pattern of pain and the movements that cause it.

Treatment

  • Physical therapy may be effective in treating mild Spinal Instability as it focuses on strengthening the muscles in the spine.
  • Pain killers and anti-inflammatory medicines may be prescribed by the doctor.
  • Microdiscectomy- Surgical removal of the intervertebral disc that is impinging on the spinal nerve.
  • Spinal Fusion- Two or more spinal vertebrae are fused together to prevent any movement between them and improve the stability of the spine.

For treatment of Spinal Instability and other orthopedic conditions, visit OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment with the spine surgeons in Frisco, you can call at (214) 618-5502 or visit 5757 Warren Pkwy, Suite 180, Frisco, TX 75034.

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