Orthopedic Treatment For Achilles Tendinitis

by Administrator 23. January 2015 11:15

Achilles tendon is a tissue connecting the heel bone to the calf muscles at the exterior of the lower leg. It is used while walking, running or jumping. Constant and rigorous physical activity can cause overuse injuries and degeneration of the tissue, a condition known as Achilles Tendinitis. Although it is mostly seen in runners, the condition is also common in middle aged people who are involved in sports like basketball or tennis.

Depending upon the damaged part of the tendon, Achilles Tendinitis can be classified as:

  • Non-insertional Achilles Tendinitis: In this, the fibers in the middle part of the tendon begin to degenerate and cause pain.
  • Insertional Achilles Tendinitis: It affects he tendon from where it attaches to the heel bone.

Causes

The most common cause of Achilles Tendinitis is excessive exercise, particularly in athletes. People with Rheumatoid Arthritis are also prone to develop the condition. Other cause may include:

  • Exercising without proper warm-up
  • Strained calf muscles due to repetitive physical activity
  • Playing sports that involve sudden change of movements, such as tennis
  • Wearing high heeled footwear regularly
  • Wearing ill-fitted or worn out shoes

Symptoms

  • Pain along the Achilles tendon, particularly in morning
  • Pain at the tendon or back of heel
  • Pain increases after a physical activity
  • Bone spurs, in some cases
  • Stiffening of the tendon
  • Severe pain after exercise
  • Swelling that worsens at the end of the day

Diagnosis

To diagnose Achilles Tendinitis, the orthopedic surgeon may recommend certain imaging tests such as CT scan, X-rays and MRI. He will also evaluate the alignment, flexibility, range of motion and reflexes of the affected foot.

Treatment

  • Applying Ice: Giving ample rest to the heel and applying ice pack on the painful area can help to reduce inflammation and swelling.
  • Medications: The orthopedic surgeon may prescribe anti-inflammatory medications to reduce pain and inflammation.
  • Exercises: The patient may also be recommended to do certain stretching and strengthening exercises to boost the healing of the inflamed tendon.
  • Orthotic Devices: Wearing shoe inserts or wedge that keeps the heel marginally raised can help to relieve strain on the tendon. Providing a cushioning to the heel reduces the force exerted on the Achilles tendon.
  • Surgery: If the condition does not improve with non-surgical approaches or if the tendon is torn, the orthopedic surgeon may prescribe surgery to treat the condition.

For diagnosis and treatment of Achilles Tendinitis, visit the orthopedic surgeons at OrthoTexas, Carrollton, TX. To schedule an appointment, you can call at (972) 492 – 1334.

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Tennis Elbow: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 19. January 2015 13:21

Tennis Elbow is a common orthopedic condition caused as a result of overuse of hand, arm and forearm muscles. In clinical terms, it is referred to as Lateral Epicondylitis and is most commonly seen in people who play tennis or other racquet sports. The condition causes inflammation in the forearm muscles at the exterior part of the elbow. Due to overuse or repetitive movements of the muscles, they are prone to damage and cause intense pain from the elbow down to the wrist.

Causes

  • Playing racquet sports
  • Performing repetitive hand or wrist activities
  • Using plumbing tools
  • Painting
  • Driving screws
  • Gripping something tightly

Symptoms

  • Pain that develops gradually
  • Pain and burning sensation at the exterior of the elbow
  • Weakened grip strength
  • Pain increases while clasping objects or shaking hands
  • Difficulty lifting even light things, like a coffee mug
  • Pain worsens when moving the wrist forcefully

Diagnosis

In order to diagnose Tennis Elbow, the orthopedic doctor physically examines the area that is experiencing pain. He may also put pressure on the affected region or make you move your fingers, wrist and elbow to ascertain the amount of pain. In most cases, a description of your symptoms is enough but for others you may be asked to undergo certain imaging tests such as X-ray or CT scan.

Treatment

The treatment options for Tennis Elbow may include the following:

Non-surgical approach

  • Rest: This is the most important part of the entire treatment process. Give ample rest to your arm, avoiding any activity that puts strain on the muscles. You must completely abstain from participating in sports or lifting weight for several weeks.
  • Anti-Inflammatory Medications: The orthopedic surgeon may also prescribe certain non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications to reduce pain and inflammation.
  • Physical Therapy: Certain stretching exercises may also help to strengthen the forearm muscles. Ultrasound, applying ice packs or other muscle stimulating techniques may also boost healing.
  • Braces: Wearing a brace placed over the hind of your forearm may also reduce the symptoms of Tennis Elbow. This will provide support and rest to the muscles, thus, allowing them to heal.

Surgical Approach

If the symptoms do not improve after 6 to 12 weeks of initiating the treatment, the orthopedic surgeon may recommend you to undergo surgery. The procedure usually involves removing the sore muscles and attaching the healthy ones to the elbow bone.

For diagnosis and treatment of Tennis Elbow you can consult the orthopedic doctor at OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment, you can call at (972) 727-9995.

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Orthopedic Treatment For Clavicle Fracture

by Administrator 12. January 2015 12:25

Clavicle, commonly known as the collarbone, is a long bone that connects the shoulder blade to the upper part of the breastbone. Clavicle Fracture, or broken collarbone, is a very common injury that can be caused as a result of a direct blow or bump to the shoulder. Children and young adults are most likely to suffer from a Clavicle Fracture.

Causes

  • Falls: Falling against the shoulder with an outstretched hand can lead to a fracture in the clavicle bone. 
  • Vehicle trauma: It can also be caused due to a bike, car or other motor vehicle collision.
  • Sports injuries: Direct blow to the shoulder while playing sports can also cause the collarbone break.
  • Birth injury: Infants can also break their clavicle as a result of force put in by the mother to deliver the baby.

Symptoms

  • Intense pain and inflammation
  • Pain increases while moving the shoulder
  • Bruising
  • Tenderness
  • Visible deformity or bump near the shoulder
  • Inability to lift the arm
  • Drooping shoulder
  • Cracking or grinding sound when trying to move the shoulder
  • Stiffness in the shoulder

Diagnosis

To make a diagnosis for Clavicle Fracture, the orthopedic surgeon may examine the affected area to look for visible deformity, swelling, tenderness or an open wound. The patient might be recommended to undergo certain imaging tests such as X-rays and CT scans to determine the extent of the injury, pinpoint the exact location and determine if any surrounding joints or muscles are damaged.

Treatment

  • Immobilization: The patient may be suggested to wear a sling for some days to provide support and restrict the movement of the affected shoulder. The duration to wear the sling usually depends upon the severity of the injury.
  • Medications: The orthopedic doctor may also recommend over the counter anti-inflammatory medications to provide relief from the pain and tenderness.
  • Physical Therapy: In many cases, physical therapy may be required simultaneously while wearing a sling. This helps to minimize stiffness and lack of motion in the shoulder. After the sling has been removed, rehabilitation exercises may be needed to restore muscle strength and flexibility.
  • Surgery: Surgery might be required in case of an open fracture if
  1. The broken bone has cut through the skin
  2.  The bone has smashed into several pieces
  3. The bone has been severely dislocated.
  4. During the procedure, the orthopedic surgeon may hold the bone in its place using plates, screws or rods.

For more information about the treatment options for clavicle fracture, visit OrthoTexas in Flower Mound. To schedule an appointment, call at (972) 899 – 4679.

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Herniated Disc: Orthopedic Treatment In Frisco, TX

by Administrator 5. January 2015 12:18

The spine is made up of a number of vertebrae that are stacked on top of each other. Discs are a type of cushions that provide support and maintain the space between two vertebrae. These discs allow movement between the vertebrae and make actions like bending and twisting possible. Herniated disc is an orthopedic condition that affects these rubbery cushions, causing them to either dislocate or break open due to strain or injury. It puts immense pressure on the spinal nerves and lead to pain, discomfort and numbness. The condition can most commonly be seen in the lower back.

Causes

The most common cause of Herniated Disc is age related degeneration. As people get old, the spinal discs gradually lose the fluid that helps them to stay flexible. This results in forming cracks and breaks in the outer most layer of disc. Thus, the thick fluid from inside may flow out through the cracks and cause the disc to rupture. Herniated Disc can also be a result of back injury.

Some other causes of herniated disc are:

  • Increased pressure or heavy strain on the back
  • Sudden twisting movement
  • Repetitive activities
  • Poor lifting habits
  • Prolonged exposure to vibration
  • Sports injuries to the back
  • Fall or blow to the back
  • Excessive weight
  • Sedentary lifestyle

Symptoms

  • Intense numbness and pain in one side of the body
  • Pain usually worsens in the night
  • Pain extending to the arms and legs
  • Pain in the front part of the thigh
  • Pain aggravates after walking a few steps
  • Burning or tingling sensation in the affected area
  • Weakness in muscles
  • Muscle pain and spasms

Treatment

The treatment options for Herniated Disc may include the following:

  • Medication: The orthopedic doctor may prescribe medications, nerve pain relievers, muscle relaxers or injections to provide relief from pain and inflammation. Sometimes a prescribed course of oral steroids may also be needed to reduce swelling or soreness.
  • Physical Therapy: Certain exercises may also help to minimize the pain and discomfort associated with a Herniated Disc. The physical therapist may also recommend traction, heat or ice packs, electrical stimulation, ultrasound or temporary bracing to treat the condition.
  • Surgery: When conservative treatment approaches do not provide relief from the symptoms, the orthopedic doctor my recommend the patient to undergo surgery. However this is required only in severe cases of Herniated Discs.

For complete diagnosis and treatment of a Herniated Disc, visit OrthoTexas in Carrollton, TX. To schedule an appointment, you can call at (972) 492 – 1334.

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