Joint Replacement

by Administrator 26. June 2017 09:46

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Shin Splints: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 23. June 2017 09:29

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Easy Ways To Prevent Running Injuries

by Administrator 20. June 2017 09:18

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Proximal Humerus Fracture: Orthopedic Plano

by Administrator 16. June 2017 07:37

Proximal Humerus Fracture is a common type of injury of the shoulder joint that is prevalent in the elderly people. It is essentially a broken or cracked shoulder bone. This joint is made up of the shoulder blade (scapula), upper part of the humerus and the collar bone (clavicle). Tissues, ligaments, tendons keep the bones connected and help in movement of the arm. These bones together form 3 important joints- the sternoclavicular, the glenohumeral and the acromioclavicular joints. Proximal Humerus Fracture is a  type of fracture that damages the upper part of the humerus bone and is most commonly observed  in women and elderly people who suffer from poor bone health.

Causes

  • A direct fall on the shoulder
  • Vehicular accidents
  • Sports injuries
  • Overuse injuries
  • Weakness of the joint and bones due to ageing
  • Physical combat or collision
  • Injury to the chest may cause fracture in the scapula
  • Forced twisting of the arm may cause displacements and soft tissue stress
  • Seizures or electric shocks can cause displacements of the joint
  • Lifting heavy objects or overhead
  • Osteoporosis

Symptoms

  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • A visible bony bump at the point of injury or fracture may develop
  • Limited range of motion remains intact
  • Bruising and discoloration around the shoulder
  • The hands and arm may turn cold if there is damage to blood vessels or nerves
  • The joint may look deformed
  • A grinding sensation when the shoulder is moved
  • Inability to move the shoulder or arm
  • The upper limb feels weak
  • In case of an open fracture, a part of the bone may be sticking out of the skin

Diagnosis

  • Details of the patient’s medical history, mode and time of injury as well as symptoms may be taken into account
  • Detailed physical examination of the injured joint and arm to check for visible symptoms and severity of injury
  • The peripheral pulses need to be checked to diagnose loss of blood supply to any part of the injured limb
  • X-ray imaging is required to analyze the changes or damage to bone structure. It helps diagnose fractures and displacements if any
  • CT scan or MRI scan may be required to assess the damage to soft tissue structures and blood vessels or nerves

Treatment

  • In case the bone is not badly broken and has not shifted from its position much, it can be treated by immobilizing the joint using a sling
  • Ice packs applied at regular intervals help reduce pain and swelling
  • Pain killers and anti-inflammatory medicines may be prescribed
  • Manual reduction of a displaced bone may be done as an initial step and it is then secured using a shoulder brace
  • Surgical fixation of the broken or displaced bone parts using metal screws, pins and plates
  • Surgical repair of tendons and ligaments that hold the joint may be required
  • Elderly people whose bones are weak and get damaged severely may require a shoulder replacement procedure
  • Physical therapy sessions may be required to restore function and strength of the joint post treatment

Consult the physicians at OrthoTexas to know more about the treatment options available for Proximal Humerus Fracture. To schedule an appointment, call at (972) 985 - 1072.

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Orthopedic Treatment For Lateral Epicondylitis

by Administrator 12. June 2017 15:39

Lateral Epicondylitis or the Tennis Elbow, is a condition that affects the elbow joint. This joint is made up of 3 bones- humerus, ulna and radius. There are some bony bumps at the base of the humerus (upper arm bone) which are called epicondyles. The bony bump that is found on the outer side of the elbow is the lateral epicondyle. These bones are held together by the muscles, tendons and ligaments. In case of Lateral Epicondylitis, the tendons of the forearm get swollen due to overuse and thus cannot lend support to the hands, wrist, elbow and upper arm. It is a painful condition that tends to deteriorate over the time.

Causes

  • Overuse of the arm or the elbow joint may weaken the muscles that support the joint. This happens especially when the ECRB or the extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon that supports the forearm muscle gets damaged
  • Minor tears in the tendons that attach the muscles and the joint bones are also a potential cause
  • The ECRB muscle may undergo gradual wear and tear as it rubs against the bones over a period of time
  • Occupations such as painters, plumbers, carpenters, butchers, typists are at a greater risk as they overuse the elbow joint
  • Athletes use the forearm and the elbow joint vigorously causing long term damage
  • Improper techniques used in playing a sport and not warming up or cooling down is a potential cause
  • People in the age group of 35-50 years are at the highest risk
  • In some cases, the tennis elbow may develop without any past history of injury or repeated use. It is termed as an insidious occurrence
  • Repeated weight lifting

Symptoms

  • Pain is mild in the initial stages and becomes severe as the condition worsens
  • A burning sensation on the outer part of the elbow
  • The limb feels weak and there is a loss of strength in the grip of the hands
  • Throwing, raising the arm, shaking hands, playing a sport is difficult
  • Both the arms may be affected at the same time
  • Joint inflammation
  • Tenderness

Diagnosis

  • Details of the patient’s lifestyle, physical activities and medical history
  • X-ray imaging
  • MRI and CT scans
  • The orthopedic doctor may flex, rotate and bend the patient’s arm, wrist and hand to check for movements that reproduce the symptoms

Treatment

  • Rest the inured arm by keeping it elevated at chest level
  • Pain killers and anti inflammatory medicines may be prescribed
  • Activity modification to prevent stressing of the muscles and tendons is suggested
  • Ice packs can be applied
  • Elbow brace or splint may be used
  • Injecting corticosteroids may be an option
  • Some specific stretching exercises can help relieve pain and improve joint function
  • Surgical repair of damaged tendons may be required when conservative methods do not work

For treatment of Lateral Epicondyliti, visit the physicians at OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment with the doctors in North Texas, call at (972) 727 - 999.

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Tibial Plateau Fractures: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 6. June 2017 15:35

Tibial Plateau Fracture is a serious type of injury that is commonly observed in athletes. It refers to a crack or break in the upper portion of the tibia or the shin bone. This is also known as the proximal tibial fracture. Tibial plateau is the uppermost part of the bone that attaches to the knee joint. It has a honeycomb kind of shape and is relatively softer than the remaining shin bone.

Such fractures may be accompanied by damage to the ligaments, muscles, blood vessels and nerves. These fractures can be categorized as follows:

  • Displaced Fractures- The bone pieces are separated from each other or the main joint
  • Non- displaced Fractures- The bone may break or crack but remains attached to te main joint in its correct anatomical position
  • Transverse- The bone breaks along a straight line
  • Comminuted- The bones are shattered into many pieces

Tibial Plateau Fracture can be a serious injury which can be limb threatening. It may cause defects in joint alignment, loss of motion/flexibility and Arthritis.

Causes

  • A fall from a height
  • Vehicular accident
  • Sports injuries
  • A direct hit or trauma to the outer part of the knee joint
  • Slight stress to a weak bone that may be a result of mineral deficiency, cancer, bone infection, osteoporosis etc
  • Stress caused by increased physical activities
  • Age related weakness of the bones make them susceptible to such breaks
  • An impact that pushed the edge of the femur into the knee joint and the tibial plateau sinks downwards

Symptoms

  • Visibly deformed knee or leg
  • Pain which can be severe at the time of weight bearing or activity
  • A feeling of pins and needles pricking the limb or foot
  • Swelling and tenderness
  • The foot below the affected knee may turn cold and pale as the blood supply is hindered
  • Numbness in the leg and foot
  • Difficulty in bending and moving the joint

Diagnosis

  • Details of the patient such as symptoms, medical history, mode of injury and lifestyle
  • Examination of the injury through visual observation, palpation and manual manipulation. The doctor will check for open wounds and deformity if any
  • X-ray imaging will be carried out to check bone damage and position. It also helps to diagnose the exact location of the fracture
  • Flow of blood to the limb and the joint may also be checked
  • MRI and CT scans may be required to assess the severity of fracture and additional damage to the soft tissue, if any
  • Arteriogram may be used to check for damaged blood vessels

Treatment

  • Rest the injured leg and avoid weight bearing
  • Apply ice packs at regular intervals
  • Keep the leg elevated at chest level
  • Soft bandage may be used for compression
  • Prescription of pain killers, anti inflammatory drugs and antibiotics
  • Knee may be immobilized for a short while using a knee brace
  • External fixation- a non-surgical procedure in which the displaced bone is fixed back (manually reduced)and held together using screws and pins that are fixed externally for a specified time period
  • Internal fixation- surgical procedure that involves anatomic reduction of the displaced bone or bone pieces and these are then fixed using metal plates or screws which are left inside the body
  • Fasciotomy- an incision is made to cut open the skin and muscles that cover the joint. The incision is left open for a few days until the blood flow is restored and swelling subsides. This is done only in case of a compartment syndrome

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Tennis Elbow

by Administrator 29. May 2017 14:19

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Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 26. May 2017 10:45

Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy, also referred to as the Shoulder Tendonitis or the Impingement Syndrome, is a medical condition that causes the tendons and muscles supporting the shoulder joint to swell up. The shoulder joint is an example of a ball and socket joint that is supported by a set of muscles called the rotator cuff. These muscles prevent the ball of the humerus from slipping out of the glenoid cavity. Strong tendons made up of connective tissues also connect the muscles to the bones. These enable us to swing, lift or move our arms. Maximum movement of this joint occurs in this area and affects the rotator cuff muscles.

Causes

  • Development of Osteophytes or Bone Spurs that impinge upon the muscles and tendons
  • Sports activities that involve a lot of movement of the arm and shoulder joint such as basketball, tennis, swimming, baseball etc. stresses the joint
  • Micro-trauma may cause repeated stress to the joint and affect its stability
  • There are small fluid filled sacs in the joint called bursae that can get swollen and thus cause Tendinopathy
  • Some people are in the habit of sleeping on one particular side of the shoulder that may stress the joint
  • Maintaining a poor posture affects the neck, shoulder and thoracic spine stability. It hampers the biomechanics of the joint
  • In some cases, the rotator cuff muscles and tendons may begin to impinge into the acromion bone causing inflammation
  • Inherent muscular weakness leading to joint instability

Symptoms

  • Pain may be felt when the patient wakes up in the morning
  • Loss of strength and stability of the joint as well as weakness in the upper arm or hands
  • Swelling and tenderness may be observed
  • Inability or discomfort in lifting the arms above the head, lifting weights or lying on the affected side of the shoulder
  • Pain may radiate down from the arm to the elbow
  • Some patients may complain of pain even while resting. This happens in aggravated cases of Tendinopathy
  • Joint stiffness
  • Range of motion may get affected
  • A feeling of cracking or joint locking

Diagnosis

  • Details of the patient’s medical history and lifestyle may be noted down
  • The doctor may ask the patient to move his/her arm in different directions to check the range of motion that is intact
  • The symptoms of the affected joint may be taken into consideration
  • X-ray imaging may be performed to check for bone alignment, bone spurs and other structural changes
  • Palpation is employed to check for swelling
  • MRI imaging
  • Ultrasound test to check for damage in the soft tissue such as muscles and tendons

Treatment

Application of ice packs at regular intervals

  • Prescription of pain killers and anti-inflammatory medicines
  • Compression using shoulder straps, taping, bandages and slings
  • The doctor may inject corticosteroids into the affected part to provide relief
  • Rest the joint and avoid any strenuous activity
  • Using a couple of pillows under the head and shoulders while sleeping may be helpful
  • A customized physiotherapy session including gentle exercises of the joint
  • Maintaining a good posture
  • Arthroscopic surgery may be required in case no relief is attained by conservative treatment methods

For treatment of Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy, visit the doctors at OrthoTexas. Call at (972) 727- 9995 (Allen) for an appointment.

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Spondylosis: Orthopedic Treatment In Frisco, TX

by Administrator 22. May 2017 10:19

Spondylosis or Osteoarthritis of spine refers to degeneration of the spine which can be physically limiting. It leads to pain in the neck, shoulder, arms and head. If the problem occurs in the neck, it is termed as Cervical Spondylosis, if it affects the lower back it is termed Lumbar Spondylosis and the Thoracic Spondylosis affects the middle portion of the back.

The condition results from the wear and tear of the intervertebral discs and stress caused to the spinal nerves. Normal vertebrae have smooth margins but as we age, the cushioning effect of the cartilage tissue and the fluids present begin to deteriorate. In most cases, Spondylosis gets alleviated through conservative treatment options.

Causes

  • Wear and tear of cartilage which causes the bones in the spine to grind against each other resulting in  friction, pain and restricted mobility
  • Growth of bone spurs (osteophytes) which tend to impinge upon the nerve endings and muscles surrounding the spinal cord
  • Degenerative disc disease
  • Poor postural habits
  • Thickening of ligaments surrounding the spine which may lead to narrowing of the spinal canal
  • Process of ageing also causes stiffness in the ligaments and their level of flexibility gets affected
  • Past injuries or trauma to the spine
  • Genetic spinal disorders
  • Compression of the spinal nerve roots as they emerge from the intervertebral spaces (foramina)
  • Drying out and stiffening of the intervertebral discs due to age
  • Spinal Arthritis, fibromyalgia or infectious Spondylitis
  • Compression fractures
  • Disc Herniation
  • Spinal Osteoarthritis
  • Sedentary lifestyle, alcohol consumption and smoking, obesity and body mass are other contributing factors

Symptoms

  • Pain which can be severe occurs in the neck and lower back
  • The pain tends to radiate downwards to the legs, hips or upwards to the shoulders and arms
  • Bending and rotation of the neck is difficult
  • Crepitus- grinding sensation when the bones rub against each other
  • Stiffness
  • Bladder incontinence in some cases
  • Muscle spasms
  • Nausea and lack of balance in the body
  • Pain tends to settle down after rest
  • Numbness and feeling of pricks and needles

Diagnosis

  • Detailed physical examination by an orthopedic doctor to assess the range of motion, reflexes and muscle stability
  • The patient’s medical history is discussed besides the family history and prevailing symptoms
  • X-ray imaging is required to study changes in bone structure
  • The doctor may flex the neck of the patient manually to check if he/she feels electric shocks
  • Cervical Compression Test
  • MRI or CT scan to examine the soft tissue structures and nerves in the spine
  • Bone density test to check the loss of calcium and minerals
  • Electromyography (EMG)
  • Nerve Conduction Velocity (NCV) test

Treatment

  • Use of ice packs or heat pads to reduce pain and swelling
  • Anti-inflammatory medicines and pain killers may be prescribed
  • Mechanical traction may be applied to release pressure between the intervertebral discs
  • It is essential to maintain proper posture while sitting and walking
  • Use of a removable neck collar or a back brace for sometime
  • Injecting corticosteroids directly into the spine
  • Physical therapy to improve spinal strength and flexibility. It includes specific stretching and strengthening exercises
  • Manual mobilizations and adjustments may be helpful
  • Complete bed rest for a few days
  • Muscle relaxants may be prescribed
  • Surgical removal of osteophytes
  • Surgical fusion of bones using metallic screws and plates
  • Removal of damaged bone parts and bone graft. It  helps reduce pressure on the nerve roots

Consult the physicians at OrthoTexas for complete treatment of Spondylosis and other spinal conditions. Spondylosis. To schedule an appointment, call at (214) 436 – 8997 or visit 2601 Avenue of the Stars, Suite 300, Frisco, TX 75034.

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Hyperextended Knee: Orthopedic Carrollton

by Administrator 19. May 2017 11:34

Knee Hyperextension occurs when the knee is bent too far backwards in the wrong direction. It is in a way pushed beyond its normal limits. Hyperextension can be mild or severe. In case of mild hyperextension, the symptoms usually subside within a few weeks but in case of severe hyperextension the ligaments that support the knee joint (ACL, PCL) may also be damaged. In addition, cartilage tissues may also be affected. The bones in young children are still forming and are very tender. Hyperextension in them may lead to chipping of a piece of bone from the main bone.

Causes

  • Sports activities that involve a lot of jumping and running or changing directions quickly
  • A strong force applied to the knee joint when the leg is in straightened position
  • Direct impact on the knee during a vehicular accident
  • Flexible sports such as gymnastics
  • Falling on the knee when the foot gets stuck or caught
  • Past injuries to the soft tissues of the joint may weaken it and make it prone to hyperextension
  • Inherent weakness of the quadriceps muscles

Symptoms

  • Pain at the back of the joint or on its sides
  • Soreness
  • Swelling and tenderness
  • A popping sound at the time of injury
  • Walking, climbing, bending and squatting can aggravate the pain and discomfort

Diagnosis

  • Analysis of the patient’s past medical records, lifestyle and symptoms reported
  • The mode and time of injury are assessed
  • X-ray imaging to assess the condition of the bones within the joint
  • MRI or CT scan may be required to study the damaged soft tissue structures
  • Palpation and observation by an orthopedic doctor

Treatment

  • Give rest to the injured leg by keeping it elevated at chest level
  • Apply ice packs at regular intervals to curb swelling
  • A soft bandage may be tied for compression
  • Use of a removable knee brace may be helpful in lending support and stability
  • Physical therapy may be recommended for muscle weakness and loss of strength in the joint. These also help build muscle mass in the joint
  • Surgery may be recommended if the condition does not settle down in spite of conservative therapy. During the procedure, the surgeon may tighten or repair the damaged cartilage or ligaments
  • Any activity that stresses or pressurizes the joint needs to be avoided post-surgery for a few weeks
  • Pain killers and anti-inflammatory medicines may be prescribed

To know more about Hyperextended Knee and other orthopedic conditions of the knee joint, get in touch with the physicians at OrthoTexas. We can be contacted at (972) 492- 1334. You can also visit us at 4780 North Josey Lane, Carrollton, TX 75010.

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