High Heel Health Hazards

by Administrator 18. March 2017 11:24

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Scheuermann's Kyphosis: Orthopedic Plano

by Administrator 14. March 2017 11:08

Scheuermann’s Kyphosis, also known as Juvenile Kyphosis or Calve’s disease, is a self-limiting disorder that creates an abnormal curvature of the spine. This is a thoracolumbar disorder that commonly affects the adolescents during their growth phase. A normal spine is vertically inclined and its cylindrical shaped vertebrae are placed one above the other to keep it stable. A slight curve is present in the spine which allows it to bear the impact of the body’s movements and to absorb external shocks effectively. In some cases, the vertebrae may grow at a different rate relative to each other and they tend to get stacked one above the other. This abnormal growth spurt increases the spinal curvature and if it exceeds 45 degrees, the condition is considered as abnormal.

Scheuermann’s Kyphosis may affect the upper back (thoracic spine) or the lower back (lumbar spine).The condition has both physical and psychological bearing on the patient and can lead to permanent disfigurement. It can also damage the internal organs in severe cases.

Causes

  • Inherent genetic structure
  • Direct or indirect injury caused to the spine
  • Inherent weakness in the skeletal structure
  • Thickening of ligaments which connect the two vertebrae may cause abnormal curvature
  • Loss or lack of blood supply to the inter-vertebral cartilage
  • Excessive bending for long hours or maintaining a poor posture for long

Symptoms

  • Pain may radiate from a specific point in the spine to the neck
  • Loss of vertebral height in teenagers
  • Pain and discomfort may get aggravated during and after activity
  • Muscle fatigue, cramps and stiffness in the back and extremities
  • Visible deformity in the form of a hunchback
  • Limited range of motion
  • The space available for the lung cavity may be compromised with the excessive curving of the spine. This may cause breathing problem.
  • Redness in the lower or upper spine region
  • Instability of the spine
  • Difficulty in sitting, lying down or standing for long
  • Tightness in the hamstring muscles

Diagnosis

  • A detailed clinical evaluation of the patient, medical history, family traits and existing symptoms
  • X-ray imaging to study the structure of the bones and changes in them, if any
  • Testing of the other parameters such as range of motion, flexibility of spine and muscle strength
  • MRI or CT scan may additionally be required

Treatment

Scheuermann’s Kyphosis can be treated surgically and non-surgically depending on the severity or progression of the disorder. The doctor may recommend a surgery if:

  • The spinal curvature exceeds 75 degrees
  • The condition is progressive and likely to deteriorate the condition further or
  • The conservative methods have not brought any relief.

Non-surgical methods

  • Prescription of anti-inflammatory medicines to ease the discomfort
  • Wearing a removable back brace may be recommended to help reverse the curvature and combat pain
  • Heating pads may be used to alleviate pain and curb inflammation. It also relaxes the surrounding soft tissues that support the spine
  • Physical therapy may helpsto improve flexibility, range of motion and strength of the spine
  • Supporting the back with additional pillows while sleeping
  • Weight bearing should be strictly avoided

Surgical methods

  • Thoracotomy- It is a type of bone graft technique in which an incision is made in the chest to remove inter-vertebral discs, tissues and place a donor bone. It then fuses with the spine. The bone may be extracted from other joints of the body such as the hip
  • Spine Fusion Instrumentation- The incision is made at the back of the spine and screws, pins, rods are inserted to correct the curvature and prevent it from becoming a permanent deformity
  • Lifting of weights and excessive bending should be avoided post-surgery for 8-12 months. This allows the bones to solidify.

To know more about Scheuermann's Kyphosis, consult the doctors at OrthoTexas. You can visit them at 4031 West Plano Parkway Suite 100, Plano, TX 75093. For an appointment, call at (972) 985 – 1072

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Orthopedic Treatment For Knee Osteonecrosis

by Administrator 11. March 2017 15:13

Death of a bone due to loss of blood supply is referred to as Osteonecrosis. The condition mostly affects the hip joint although the knees may also get damaged. It is one of the most common causes of knee pain in women above the age of 60 years. The knee joint gets its blood supply from the two main arteries: femoral artery and the popliteal artery. During Osteonecrosis, the blood supply to the lateral femoral condoyle or the medial femoral condoyle, two main bones of the thigh, may get disrupted. The top of the tibia or the lower leg bone may also be damaged. The bones thrive on uninterrupted blood supply just like the body tissues and they tend to die if it is disrupted. Over a period of time, the bones begin to disintegrate. The other joints that may also be affected are elbow, shoulder and ankle. Knee Osteonecrosis takes a few months or a year to progress to its last stage.

Causes

  • Trauma caused to the knee or leg
  • Bone density loss due to ageing may lead to secondary fractures and eventually Necrosis
  • Osteoporosis makes the bones of the joint prone to micro tears and fractures
  • Edema or fluid accumulation in the joint spaces post injury
  • Conditions such as Sickle cell disease, Caisson disease, Gaucher disease, Pancreatitis, etc.
  • Excessive alcohol consumption may increase the risk
  • Obesity
  • Surgical procedures for kidney transplant
  • Prolonged use of steroids
  • Lupus
  • Blood clots may block the flow of blood in the arteries
  • After-effects of radiation therapy

Symptoms

  • Considerable pain, particularly while sleeping or when the joint is stressed post activity
  • The onset of the pain may either be sudden or triggered by some causative factors
  • The joint may feel tender and sensitive when touched
  • Range of motion may be affected
  • Inflammation of the joint
  • Formation of bone spurs
  • Change in shape of the bones or joint
  • Altered gait

Diagnosis

  • Analysis of the patient’s medical history and symptoms
  • Palpation to check for inflammation and locate pain
  • Bone scans
  • X-ray imaging
  • MRI or CT scan may be recommended

Treatment

  • Pain killers and anti inflammatory medicines may be prescribed
  • The doctor may suggest to avoid weight bearing activities
  • A removable knee brace may be used for added support
  • The doctor may recommend activity modification at home and the workplace
  • Physical therapy to maintain and improve joint function and flexibility
  • Arthroscopic debridement of the joint
  • Total replacement of the joint, in case the disease has progressed to the last stages
  • Holes may be drilled into the affected bone to promote blood flow

For comprehensive treatment of Knee Osteonecrosis, visit OrthoTexas in Allen, TX. To request an appointment, call at (972) 727 - 9995.

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Overlapping Toes: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 7. March 2017 14:19

Overlapping Toes refers to a foot deformity that occurs when one of the toes overrides the adjacent toe. The condition commonly affects the fifth and the second toe. Overlapping is generally detected at the time of birth or during early infancy. As the person ages, the deformity tends to become more rigid.

Overlapping Toes may occur at any time in life and is more common in women than men.

Causes

  • Genetic traits passed on from the parents to the child
  • Congenital – it is believed that the position of the fetus in the womb is such in some cases that the foot gets cramped resulting in this deformity at the time of birth
  • Wearing pointed, high heeled shoes for a long time
  • Tightness in tendon or ligament that pulls the bone of the toe
  • Faulty foot biomechanics- fallen arches or high arched, both can result in Overlapping Toes
  • Bunions on the big toe may result in overlapping of the second toe as the former tends to bend against it
  • If the second toe is the longest amongst the others, it may tend to overlap
  • Hammer Toes
  • Joint injuries or displacements may alter the position of the bones

Symptoms

  • Visibly deformed toes
  • Formation of painful calluses over the time
  • Swelling and pain in the toes as they rub against the shoes
  • Corn formation or hardening of the skin on the toes due to constant friction
  • Change in gait
  • In case the fifth toe overrides the fourth one, a small Bunion may be formed on its outer side

Diagnosis

  • Analysis of the patient’s medical and family history besides taking note of the symptoms reported
  • X-ray imaging of the foot to study bone structure
  • MRI scan may be used to analyze the position and structure of tendons and ligaments that support the foot
  • Palpation and observation may be applied to assess condition of the affected toe

Treatment

  • Passive techniques may be used in case of infants to treat the condition
  • Taping of the toes using special adhesive tapes to hold the affected toe in place. This may be applied for 6-12 weeks depending on the case
  • In severe cases, surgical release of the affected tendon or ligament may be performed
  • A pin may be surgically inserted to reposition the toe. It may be kept for a few weeks and then removed. The patient may be required to wear a cast or a special boot during this period
  • A splint may be used to secure the toe post-surgery
  • Use of shoes with soft shoes soles may be recommended
  • Use of orthotic devises such as shoe inserts may help to distribute body weight equally by rectifying the fallen or high arches

Visit the foot and ankle specialists at OrthoTexas for complete treatment of Overlapping Toes. For an appointment with the orthopedic doctors in Denton, TX, call at (940) 382 - 1577.

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Growth Plate Fractures: Treatment In Carrollton, TX

by Administrator 27. February 2017 02:52

The growth plate is a mass of cartilage tissue that is found around the edges of the long bones such as the femur, ulna and the radius. Each of these bones has at least two growth plates at their ends and the bone development occurs around these plates.

The growth plate tends to harden or ossify at the end of the growth cycle of the child once the bones have attained their full length. These are weak soft tissue structures that can break with slight external pressure or overuse.
It is estimated that about 30% of the fractures reported during childhood or in young adults, pertain to growth plates. Being soft, this part of the bone is essentially prone to cracks or damage. It becomes imperative to treat such injuries at the earliest as they are crucial determinants of the child’s growth level.

Causes

  • A fall on an outstretched hand or knee
  • Vehicular accidents may have a high impact and crack the bone shaft along with the growth plate
  • Collisions or direct hit to the limb
  • Repeated stress to the joints and the growth plate leading to stress fracture
  • Recreational activities such as biking, skateboarding, skiing etc. may increase the risk of such fractures
  • Growth plate fractures are more common in boys as compared to girls as the latter attain maturity earlier and therefore their growth plates ossify sooner

Symptoms

  • Visibly deformed limb
  • Pain may set in immediately after the injury and may range from severe, localized to persistent
  • A feeling of warmth may spread over the skin around the injured limb
  • Swelling and tenderness
  • Inability to perform daily tasks
  • Limited range of motion

Diagnosis

  • The patient’s medical history, symptoms as well as mode and time of injury may be noted down
  • X-ray imaging may be required to study the damage to the bone structure
  • MRI or CT scan may be done to locate the fracture in the growth plate which is a soft tissue structure

Treatment

The treatment method adopted in each case may differ depending on the child’s age, grade of injury, location of fracture as well as the overall health. These may include the following.

  • Immobilization of the limb using a cast or splint to keep the bones in place while they heal
  • Restricting the levels of patient’s daily activities
  • Some pain killers and anti inflammatory medicines may be prescribed
  • Open Reduction- If unstable fractures are accompanied by bone displacements, surgery may be required. During the procedure, an incision is made to reposition the bone pieces. They are then held in place using screws and pins
  • The limb is secured in a cast post surgery and physical therapy may be recommended
  • Regular follow ups may be required until the child attains maturity to keep a check on the development of the bone

For treatment of Growth Plate Fractures and other orthopedic conditions, visit OrthoTexas. To schedule an appointment, call at (972) 492 – 1334 or visit 4780 North Josey Lane, Carrollton, TX 75010.

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Common Football Injuries

by Administrator 25. February 2017 09:40

 

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Orthopedic Treatment For Baker’s Cyst

by Administrator 25. February 2017 02:28

A fluid filled cyst or small sac that forms behind the knee joint is referred to as the Baker’s Cyst. It is also named as Popliteal Cyst. This condition occurs when the joint functioning is hampered due to an internal cause such as damage to the soft tissue structures, Arthritis etc. Such conditions provoke excessive synovial fluid development within the joint which tends to get stored in a soft tissue sac resulting in the formation of a cyst. In normal conditions, the synovial fluid helps to reduce friction between the constituent bones and makes it feasible for us to flex, rotate and move the legs and the knee. However, excessive build up can cause some discomfort which may require immediate medical attention.

Causes

  • Knee injury may alter the flow and distribution of fluid in the joint
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Damage caused to the joint cartilage

Symptoms

  • Pain while flexing the knee
  • Tightness due to the fluid accumulation as the skin around the joint also stretches
  • Swelling or inflammation at the back of the joint
  • In case the fluid filled sac breaks and the fluid outflows into the lower leg, redness and inflammation may occur in the lower extremities
  • Visibly prominent bulge behind the knee
  • Some patients may feel as if water is running down their legs
  • Inflammation in the calf area

Diagnosis

  • The affected joint and leg are observed in detail and the patient may be questioned about the symptoms, past injuries and the onset of the condition
  • MRI test may be required for detailed view of the knee joint and the affected soft tissue structures
  • X-ray imaging may be done
  • Ultrasound testing may be suggested

Treatment

  • The cyst tends to dissolve on its own over the time in most cases. If the symptoms persist or get aggravated, the following methods may be adopted.
  • Draining the excess fluid using a needle which is referred to as Needle Aspiration
  • Ice therapy may provide relief
  • Injecting steroids into the joint to reduce inflammation and pain
  • The knee may be wrapped in a removable bandage for slight compression and support
  • Weight bearing should be avoided for some time and use of crutches or a walker may be recommended
  • Some pain killers and anti inflammatory medicines may be prescribed
  • Maintaining a healthy body weight to avoid stressing the joint may be recommended
  • Gentle exercises that promote range of motion may be incorporated in the daily schedule
  • In case the underlying cause is a cartilage tear, surgery may be required to treat it
  • Physical activity needs to be avoided for some time and the affected joint should be given adequate rest

For diagnosis and treatment of Baker’s Cyst, visit the knee surgeons at OrthoTexas. To request an appointment, you can call at (972) 727 - 9995.

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Congenital Vertical Talus: Orthopedic Treatment In Flower Mound

by Administrator 22. February 2017 02:14

Vertical Talus is a foot deformity that occurs at the time of birth. It is a rare condition that affects the talus, a small bone that is placed between the lower leg bones (fibula and tibia) and the calcaneus (heel bone) to form the ankle joint. This bone acts an important node between the foot and the leg that enables transfer of body weight on to the foot while walking and other physical activities. Congenital Vertical Talus disrupts the formation of the talus bone which in turn displaces the other two bones of the lower leg that then shift on top of the talus. Either one or both the feet may get affected. This condition is also a major cause of Flatfoot formation in newborns. It may lead to serious disability in later life, if left untreated.

Causes

  • Neuromuscular disorders in the baby
  • Spina bifida
  • Neurofibromatosis
  • Arthrogryposis
  • Genetic mutation of a set of genes may be responsible

Symptoms

  • The forefoot tends to point upwards
  • The forefoot may turn up to touch the shin bone
  • Absence of foot arch ( Flatfoot )
  • The base or bottom of the foot may be turned outwards which is why this condition is also referred to as the ‘rocker bottom’
  • Pain is generally not felt
  • Foot may be stiff
  • Abnormal gait
  • Callouses may develop if the child starts walking with this condition

Diagnosis

  • Congenital Vertical Talus may be diagnosed before birth if an ultrasound is performed
  • Detailed clinical examination of the foot to check for the symptoms of deformity and degree of bone deformity
  • X-ray imaging to assess the bone structure
  • Some lab tests may be recommended
  • MRI or CT scan to asses the condition of the surrounding soft tissue structures

Treatment

  • Casting the affected foot in a brace may help correct the deformity in early stages of life
  • Regular stretching and gentle exercises prescribed by a physical therapist may be helpful to restore the correct anatomical shape of the foot and improving its flexibility
  • Surgery may be recommended after the child attains 10-12 months of age, if the conservative treatment fails to give results. It may be done to realign the bones and fasten them using pins and screws
  • The ligaments and tendons may be lengthened surgically to facilitate the movement of the ankle joint
  • The foot may be immobilized in a cast for a couple of weeks post  surgery to aid recovery
  • The child is advised to get regular checks done to monitor his/her growth post treatment
  • Special walking boot may be used to improve the condition and prevent reoccurrence


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Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

by Administrator 19. February 2017 12:17

Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis or SCFE is a hip condition that mostly occurs in teenagers.  The hip is a ball and socket joint in which the head of the thigh bone fits into the socket of the large pelvic bone called acetabulum. The thigh bone grows along two growth plates (physis) that are found at each end of the femur. The growth head located at the upper end of the femur solidifies to become the femoral head and is also referred to as the epiphysis. In case of SCFE, this epiphysis gets displaced as the head of the thigh bone slips backwards. The condition may take some time to develop and is more prevalent in teenage boys. Timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment is necessary to prevent future complications like Hip Arthritis.

SCFE can be classified as follows:

  • Stable SCFE - The joint feels slightly unstable and the patient may be able to move around with some help
  • Unstable SCFE - The patient is unable to bear body weight even if walking aids such as a walker or crutches are used. This condition may also become a potential cause of Avascular Necrosis in the hip bone.

Causes

  • A sudden fall
  • Major trauma caused to the hip or pelvis joint
  • Hereditary factors
  • Being obese or over weight
  • Metabolic disorders such as hyperthyroidism
  • In some cases, a person may develop SCFE over a period of time even with no previous record of physical injury

Symptoms

  • Pain may be felt in the hip, groin, knee or thigh post injury
  • Stiffness
  • Unstable joint
  • Inability to bear body weight
  • In most cases, only one side of the hip joint is affected. However, in patients below the age of 10 years, the chances of both sides being affected are higher
  • The affected leg may appear shorter and turned outwards compared to the normal one
  • Change in gait
  • Physical activity may exaggerate the symptoms

Diagnosis

  • Medical history, family traits and symptoms may be taken into account
  • Detailed clinical evaluation may be required to check range of motion in the affected leg
  • The patient’s gait may be observed
  • X-ray imaging may be conducted to analyze bone structure and locate the femoral head

Treatment

The femoral head or epiphysis is stabilized through a surgical procedure in all cases. It may be carried out as follows:

  • In case of stable SCFE, in situ fixation is carried out by fixing the femoral head using a metal screw. As the growth plate grows and the screw gets fused within it
  • In case of unstable SCFE, a large incision is made in the hip joint and the displaced bone head is brought back to the correct anatomical position. It is held in place using two screws which eventually fuse within the joint
  • In cases where in the patient is likely to develop SCFE in the opposite hip as well, in situ fixation may be preformed to eliminate the risk
  • Physical therapy may be recommended post surgery
  • The patient may be advised to use crutches for a few weeks to allow the joint to heal
  • Regular follow ups and some repeat X-rays may be required to monitor the joint condition for 1-2 years after surgery

Visit the joint doctors at OrthoTexas for complete treatment of Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis and other disorders of the hip. To schedule an appointment with the orthopedic surgeons in Denton, TX, call at (940) 382-1577.

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Wrist Dislocation: Orthopedic Frisco

by Administrator 15. February 2017 10:38

The wrist joint connects the two bones of the forearm (ulnar and radius) to the smaller bones of the hand. There are eight carpal bones in the hand which are held together and connected to the other bones by ligaments. The eight carpal bones that form the wrist joint are named as the Capitate, Trapezoid, Hamate, Pisiform, Trapezium, Lunate, Scaphoid and Triquetrum. Displacement of any of these bones may result in Wrist Dislocation. The condition may also be accompanied by ligament and nerve damage.

Causes

  • Fall on an outstretched hand
  • Sports injuries
  • Vehicular accidents
  • Physical combat
  • Direct hit on the wrist with a ball while playing or any other object may cause dislocations and fractures
  • Past injuries or hand fractures make the wrist prone to dislocations
  • Workplace accidents

Symptoms

  • Severe pain
  • Visibly deformed wrist joint
  • Swelling and stiffness
  • The joint may feel tender when touched
  • In case of nerve damage, a tingling sensation in the thumb or the fingers may occur
  • Bruising
  • Range of motion may be affected

Diagnosis

  • Detailed observation of the injured hand by an orthopedic doctor
  • Palpation may be used to check for exact point of dislocations and swelling
  • The mode and time of injury may be taken into consideration besides the symptoms, past medical records and injuries, if any
  • X-ray imaging may be required to assess the damage to the bone structure
  • MRI scan may be required in some cases for a better view and if damage to nerve or ligaments is suspected
  • Neurovascular examination of the joint may be done

Treatment

  • Application of ice packs may help to reduce swelling
  • Pain killers may be prescribed
  • Use of a soft bandage for compression and support may be helpful
  • Splinting the wrist and fingers
  • The injured hand should be rested on an elevated surface
  • Simple bracing and cast may be used to reduce the dislocated bones and restore functionality of the joint in case of minor injuries
  • Surgical reduction (putting the displaced bone back in place) may be carried out and the process may involve use of pins, wires and screws to hold the bone in place
  • The hand may be secured using a cast for a few weeks
  • The surgical procedure may be followed by a physical therapy plan to promote strength, stability and restore range of motion
  • Some changes at the work place may be suggested by an occupational therapist for recovery and prevention of future damage to the joint

For comprehensive treatment of Wrist Dislocation, consult OrthoTexas, leading groups of orthopedic doctors and physicians serving Frisco, TX. To request an appointment, call at (214) 618 – 5502.

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